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Links 1 through 10 of 16 by Latoya Peterson tagged literature

"In a column Anousha Nzume wrote about some of the stereotype passages in the novel. 'Main character David believes that there are two types of 'Black' women. The Sherida chain (Sherida was a popular Surinam name); very dark skinned, wears at least size 46. Cup size 95 F. Not taller then 1.65. At least one of her garments has tiger print. She dates any man. Breezer desirable but not essential. Available in the 'negro women disco'. Then there is the 'bounty' (black from the outside, white from the inside), highly educated with dreadlocks. Dates only white men, in the absence of negroes of a certain level. She is boring, unsociable and mainly dressed in batik. You can find her at a slavery debate.'"

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"Much of the work by mixed-race artists, though certainly not all of it, reveals the fault lines and pressure points that still exist in a rapidly changing America. It is on these rough edges that many multiracial people live, and where many artists find the themes that animate their work: the limits of tolerance, hidden or unacknowledged assumptions about identity, and issues of racial privilege and marginalization."

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Say that, Sherman Alexie!--AJP "When some cultural critics fret about the 'ever-more-appalling' YA books, they aren’t trying to protect African-American teens forced to walk through metal detectors on their way into school. Or Mexican-American teens enduring the culturally schizophrenic life of being American citizens and the children of illegal immigrants. Or Native American teens growing up on Third World reservations. Or poor white kids trying to survive the meth-hazed trailer parks. They aren’t trying to protect the poor from poverty. Or victims from rapists.

"No, they are simply trying to protect their privileged notions of what literature is and should be. They are trying to protect privileged children. Or the seemingly privileged."

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"Charles Montgomery thinks Korean literature could be on the brink of a popularity breakthrough.

"But when he looked on Wikipedia he was disappointed to find a dearth of information about it. Major authors were overlooked: Gong Ji-young’s page was a 60-word stub; Park Wan-suh had no page at all.

"That’s a disastrous situation in an age when if something isn’t on Wikipedia it doesn’t exist."

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"When one lives in a settler-colonialist state, when one is ashamed of or conflicted about one's settler privilege or the actions of one's ancestors, it can appear to be emotionally simpler, easier, to identify with an indigenous viewpoint. "If I had lived then," so many of these books and movies say, "I would have done differently. I would have been on the side of the Natives." [4]

Almost always: would have done. Would have been.

Almost never: am doing.

Do you know what I long for? Truly, truly long for, from these white children's book authors who are guilty and unsettled about their settler's privilege? Books that engage with that. Books that discuss how to be white and in possession of settler-colonial privilege, how to look that in the face without going into a destructive tailspin of amnesia, guilt, futiliy, and appropriation."

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"Don’t tell me that this film is magically fine because there is Zhang Jizhong who got Gaiman on board in the first place or because there will be Chinese actors in the cast. That would be to overlook a cultural power dynamic of putting this inherently Asian work (and it is Asian: it is an East Asian story founded on a Chinese pilgrimage to India along a route that stretched through modern Iran and northern territories that were not Chinese then – it is a journey, a proper epic journey, not just through geography but also history) into the hands of Western media professionals whose bibliography or filmography demonstrate a clear disregard for the heritage of cultures not their own."

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Racializens, what are your thoughts on this?--AJP "At present, however, a literature insisting that the problem of the 21st century remains the problem of the color line paradoxically obscures the economic and political problems facing many black Americans, unless those problems can be attributed to racial discrimination. If the nation's black citizens are suffering largely for the same reasons its white citizens are suffering, then that is a problem about which such politics has nothing to say. In the world we inhabit, discrimination stands out most blatantly as the problem to be addressed when you've got a lot of life's other problems whittled down to a manageable size..."

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"In the complaint, Ms. Cooper argues that one of the book’s principal characters, Aibileen Clark, is an unauthorized appropriation of her name and image, which she finds emotionally distressing.

"It is more complicated than that. For the past dozen years, Ms. Cooper has worked – and still works – for Ms. Stockett’s brother and sister-in-law."

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"Over at AlterNet, activists and writers Adrienne Maree Brown and Dani McClain discuss the 14th amendment and the role of corporations in U.S. democracy. They ask, “Corporations ain’t people, so why do they have the power of citizens?” It’s a discussion that was sparked in part by the January 21 anniversary of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United, which allowed unlimited corporate spending on political campaigns. But it expanded more broadly from email discussions around ongoing attacks on the 14th amendment that go back long before the Court’s controversial ruling. Yet what makes this conversation different from most? It’s honest and hopeful talk. And invokes the wisdom of famed black science fiction writer Octavia Butler..."

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"What is a word worth? According to Publishers Weekly, NewSouth Books' upcoming edition of Mark Twain's seminal novel 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' will remove all instances of the 'n' word -- I'll give you a hint, it's not nonesuch -- present in the text and replace it with slave. The new book will also remove usage of the word Injun. The effort is spearheaded by Twain expert Alan Gribben, who says his PC-ified version is not an attempt to neuter the classic but rather to update it."

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