Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 8 of 8 by Latoya Peterson tagged kartinarichardson

"Mad Men: Uh no. You see, our show is about the world of white ad men. Blacks weren't part of that world. It's not racist, it's just how it was and our show reflects that... but we do have female characters... and we do find a way of addressing women's issues... which weren't a part of an ad man's world either really so... um...

"Boardwalk Empire: When you've got a show, you decide who the show is about.  It isn't born in one concrete unchangeable way. Our show is about a corrupt white politician, and his mobster cronies, but we've also got a fantastic black character. It's not so hard to do you know. You just make a black character that's relevant to the life of your main guy. There you go. Bada boom. Psst, you write the show, you create the characters remember? It's only "pandering to a rosy version of history" if you ain't creative."

Share It With Others!

"For those living in a very dark hole, HBO’s new drama is produced and occasionally directed by Martin Scorsese. Set in Atlantic City at the beginning of Prohibition, the show follows corrupt politician and gangster Nucky "Steve Buscemi" Thompson as he claws his way to the top. Like 'Mad Men', the series takes us back to another popular decade for Halloween costume ideas. Unlike 'Mad Men', 'Boardwalk Empire' will have a black character with a life of his own. Fans of 'The Wire' collectively pissed their pants to see Michael Kenneth Williams (better known as Omar) portray Chalky White “the de facto Mayor of Atlantic City’s African-American community”, which at the time was twenty percent of the vote."

Share It With Others!

"Louis makes a point of knocking himself off his own high horse, and this is the kind of self deprecation everyone loves. Sure he'll fight with friend and fellow comedian Nick DiPaulo over anti-Obama racism, but his frenzied tip toeing around race when courting a black woman will betray his own latent racial bias. In his interaction with Tarese, Louis reminds us that as miserable, sexless, and fat as he claims to be, he remains white and male. With that comes certain power and privilege, as well as a sense of entitlement that you may not always realize is at work.

"The last two sentences Tarese says are the ones that get to the heart of the interaction:

"You don't get what you want. Not all the time."

Share It With Others!

"I am the daughter of a Malaysian woman. That Malaysian woman is the daughter of a Chinese woman. That Chinese woman was sold as a baby to Malays (as my mother says: It is the universal Chinese practice of not valuing your daughters as much as your sons). The stories of the women in the film are not my stories or even the stories of my mother, but they are the stories of the women in my grandmother’s family.

And I was clueless about it all. I was a stranger. The extended family I grew up with was my father’s family. An African American family. 'Grandma' was my father’s mother. I didn’t know my mother’s family, knew zilch about my Asian heritage and so felt little connection. I understood that I was Asian but my Asianness was just the way people saw me. Like a costume I wore.

Share It With Others!

"I don't want the power of judgment. I want a full plot line dammit. Maybe Roger has a butler and he and I can get together. I mean really get together, and our hot passionate love affair will bring us on a freedom ride down to Alabama where we will love each other in the sticky, sweaty Alabaman heat... and Sterling Cooper has some business down there and they do some advertising blah blah blah."

Share It With Others!

"The media devours palatable representations of 'ethnic' beauty. It allows them to truly believe they're celebrating diversity while continuing to maintain a certain aesthetic. This is certainly no new revelation, but Munn's presence in the news last week offers us another opportunity to consider the media’s habitual white washing of color.
"No where has this practice been more noticeable than in images of African American women in film, television, and music. Black women come in a multitude of different shades: Freckly yellow, copper, blacker than black, and even ::whisper:: ashy gray. We have a multitude of different ass sizes and a plethora of hair textures. If, however, you grew up in a small and dark cave with nothing but the glow of a television to light your way, you would never know this."

Share It With Others!

"First, it must be mentioned that if this is in fact a move in support of the natural beauty of women, it is the 'natural' white female that is celebrated. There is a glaring lack of diversity on the company's site and in ads. Sure, sure, there are a few sprinklings of brown about, but more often than not the representations are quite fair and with "that good hair." Many of the girls look multiracial and while I am fully in support of this (as a multiracial woman myself), there is a definite avoidance in AA ads of anything that can be solidly identified as plain ol' Black. The lighter the skin, the nicer the hair— the better."

Share It With Others!

"The problem is you cannot celebrate the antebellum South without celebrating slavery. A celebration of slavery is not just the celebration of the oppression of Black Americans, but of a pain wrought on all Americans. Every part of antebellum life was made possible by the enslavement of millions of people."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT