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Links 1 through 8 of 8 by Latoya Peterson tagged japaneseamerican

"One day, Herzig-Yoshinaga stumbled upon a report that suggested the policy was based more on racism than military necessity.

"Government lawyers had argued that the U.S. rounded up all Japanese Americans on the West Coast because there wasn't time to determine who was loyal and who was not.

But the document Herzig-Yoshinaga found, an early draft of a report by Lieut. Gen. John L. DeWitt to his Army superiors, said that time had not been the issue. DeWitt wrote that internments were necessary because Japanese cultural traits prevented officials from distinguishing between loyal and disloyal Japanese Americans—'it was impossible to separate the sheep from the goats.'

"Herzig-Yoshinaga's discovery played an important role in the commission's conclusion that internment was a product of 'race prejudice, war hysteria and the failure of political leadership.'"

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"'I don’t really have a lot of Japanese friends — on purpose,' said Chiaki, 25, who is looking for work in fashion marketing and asked that her last name not be published for fear that it would jeopardize her visa. 'I have my pride in being Japanese, but I am totally a New Yorker.'

"Still, Japanese expatriates here say they have been wired into the unfolding disaster. Many said they were keeping in close touch with family and friends through Twitter and other social media. Some, like Hitomi Kasai, a 52-year-old nurse, are wondering whether to return to Japan to help victims. New relief efforts are being started in New York every day."

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"Each year, the Day of Remembrance is held around February 19th to commemorate the day that President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, resulting in the incarceration of over 110,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. If you're in the Los Angeles, the Japanese American National Museum invites you to take part in its Community Day of Remembrance.

"This year's theme, 'September 11: Ten Years After' was selected to address growing anti-Muslim sentiments and attacks on mosques across the country, and to affirm the importance for Japanese Americans to support the parallel concerns of the Muslim American community."

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In an attempt to deal with the city’s budget crisis, all Los Angeles public libraries will now be closed on Sundays and Mondays, a move that went into effect three days ago.

In addition to the new five-day schedule, some branch libraries, like the one in Little Tokyo, also face reduced hours.

Nevertheless, Ohta said the change in library hours would greatly affect patrons.

“Closing on Mondays will be bad for the community – we get lots of people on Mondays,” he said. “And since the Central Library will be closed, they’ll have nowhere to go.”

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"The above photo was taken in the fall of 1941 at the University of Washington before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. At the time, they were UW's single largest ethnic group. But by spring, they were gone, shipped away and incarcerated in internment

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Thx Tereza! "House Bill 2823 would apply to students enrolled at an Oregon college or university when they were forced into internment camps by presidential executive order in 1942."

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Thanks Angry Asian Man! "Scott Fujita, a white guy who was pretty much raised Japanese American (adopted by a Japanese American father and a white mother)...his grandparents were among the Japanese Americans interned during World War II."

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"...In 1949, she became the seventh person to be convicted of treason in American history and served six years in prison. But doubts about her possible role as Tokyo Rose later surfaced and she was pardoned by President Gerald Ford in 1977..."

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