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Links 1 through 10 of 14 by Latoya Peterson tagged internet

"Mamiverse wants to be for Latinas what Oprah Winfrey was for African-Americans: a pal, a spiritual adviser, and, more subtly, an image changer. In a period when American-born Latinas have been caught in the national freakout about “border security,” Mamiverse offers them a new spokeswoman. She’s a particular kind of Latina mom—an English-speaking, all-American gal. “The young, acculturated, affluent, online Latina is speaking English, and is imbibing media in English,” says Rene Alegria, the site’s 36-year-old founder and CEO.

Alegria wants Mom—benevolent and wise, skeptical and demanding—to lead the political conversation. “We’re rebranding our community,” he says."

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"Cyril argues that it’s no surprise that young people of color consume more media. 'We’re building up this technology infrastructure to avoid and to relieve stress and we’re losing public and community infrastructure [that could help youth relieve stress],' Cyril said. 'Recreation facilities are being decimated. Arts programs are being decimated. Basically all the places a person goes to transform stress.'

"The point for minority youth, Cyril suggests, is not to limit their media consumption but to engage them and empower them with education. By learning about the relationship between the Federal Communications Commission, telecom and media companies, and the Department of Justice, youth can hold accountable the media and technology industries they keep in business."

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"Two websites launched this week, Karma Japan and Ignorant and Online, collect a wide assortment of terrible, insensitive, hateful things said by stupid people about Japan and her people after the earthquake. Mostly, this is thick-headed white people in America saying the disaster is 'karma for Peal Harbor.' Feeding the trolls? Perhaps, but it's still an interesting sociological snapshot."

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"I wish there was a way to talk about being a woman in the culture without replicating the fact that in this misogynist culture, women get status from how sexually desireable they are. I find a great deal of online feminism to be, to a certain extent, about a kind of performative desireability, which doesn't leave a lot of room for women that society doesn't find desireable--like many Spanish and black females, or Asian females who don't fit certain Orientalist stereotypes (or do), or women who don't have the right body type or who are no longer young--or who don't find themselves desired in their own lives. The media and just living our lives in the world can make us feel bad enough about not being desireable (or with aging, no longer being desireable); it's unfortunate that online feminism compounds this effect in such unthinking ways."

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"Around the same time I created MizX I created another ladyblog persona and I called her DarlingBecky (surprise?!!) [...] I chose to set up the most common and illogical racist arguments I was familiar with so that the folks with good sense could knock them down. After all, I’ve been trained to argue both sides.

"The experiment didn’t last long…in part because I am apparently too blatant to pull off subtle satire and in part because I quickly grew bored of being so inane. But in the time DarlingBecky was on the ladyblog she made dozens of purposeful, flat-out ignorant and flagrantly racist comments in the smarmiest tone I could conjure. She offered absolutely nothing of substance. And she was never banned…even after several people pointed out that she was an obvious troll."

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"[P]eople make pseudo-scientific claims so often that I don't have the energy to get worked up about every one. There was an American Christian minister that said abortions caused the oil leak in the Gulf, a Russian businessman who was firing workers who were living with their partner before marriage because he thought it caused wildfires, a ministry in Samoa that said gays were to blame for climate change. ... It's all equally silly. Unfortunately I think one reason why Boobquake was popular was because it happened to poke fun at a Muslim in the Middle East -- I wish people realized just as many ridiculous things are said right here, and from their own religious beliefs."

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"Amanda Palmer, who, for some reason, gets carte blanche to do things such as:

* Write long blog posts that don’t actually address any of the critiques raised and instead contain classic dodges like “I’m sorry that you were offended.”
* Make fun of her critics’ very existence on Australian television. (DISABLED FEMINISTS HAR HAR HAR SOOO FUNNY U GUYZ!!11)
* Say that she’s been “crucified” by these same critics.
* Leave several ill-advised 140-character “responses” on Twitter.

Throughout all of this, you are still the one who is Too Sensitive To Be On the Internet. And even if you’ve made it pretty clear that you are a fan of the person you are criticizing — as I did — you’ll still be portrayed as a hater."

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"In a world of blogging and pagerank, critiquing trolls gives them both literal and figurative capital. That's frustrating as hell."

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"the real face behind Facebook is the 40-year-old Silicon Valley venture capitalist and futurist philosopher Peter Thiel...in 1998 he co-wrote a book called The Diversity Myth, which is a detailed attack on liberalism and the multiculturalist ideology"

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"Now we’re not saying this is the best of hip-hop, but we’re definitely saying...it’s the best example I’ve seen of an artist utilizing the power of the Web to break his career. Sure, Cassie broke on YouTube, but how many records did she sell?"

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