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Links 1 through 10 of 10 by Latoya Peterson tagged immigrantworkers

"Yet the three million professional, long-term home caregivers today are faced with a rapidly aging Baby Boomer population and a lack of adequate support, compensation or respect. Yesterday in Washington, the National Domestic Workers Alliance held what they called a Care Congress, an event where they introduced a campaign to 'transform long-term care.' The campaign is designed to push legislative changes to Medicare and Medicaid—creating jobs by increasing the amount of money eligible people can spend on at-home care and allowing a rapidly aging population to avoid institutionalization.

"Labor Secretary Hilda Solis praised the work of home care workers—a group comprised primarily of immigrant women..."

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"Among the employers who have felt the impact of the administration’s tactics are two owners of Mexican restaurants in the Chuy’s Mesquite Broiler chain, which are popular for their laid-back Margaritaville mood and their broiled mahi tacos. On April 20, immigration agents descended on 14 Chuy’s restaurants in coordinated raids in Arizona and California, detaining kitchen workers and carrying away boxes of payroll books and other evidence.

"But at the arraignment days later in federal court here, no immigrant workers stood before the judge. The only criminal defendants were the owners, Mark Evenson and his son Christopher, and an accountant who worked with them, Diane Ingrid Strehlow. If the Evensons are convicted on all charges against them of tax fraud and harboring [undocumented] workers, they each could face more than 80 years in jail."

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"But Napa is taking a different approach, providing affordable basic necessities for migrant workers — food, shelter and support — regardless of whether they are here legally or not.

"The effort was born of compassion and practicality. Without migrant labor, most of it from Mexico, the wine producers in Napa would be hard pressed to fill a carafe, much less the valley’s nine million annual cases."

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"A US federal agency has filed lawsuits over the unequal treatment of more than 500 migrant workers from India brought into the country to work at shipyards in Mississipi and Texas, and over 200 Thai farm labourers brought in to work in Hawaii and Washington state.

"The US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said on Wednesday that the workers were forced to live in substandard housing and were exploited with fees that meant that for some their net earnings were almost zero.

"The EEOC termed the treatment of the workers as amounting to human trafficking, even though they had been brought into the country on work visas."

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"Schools like Sherwood, and teachers like Mr. Ramos, are on the front lines, struggling against family mobility, neighborhood violence and the “pobrecito,” or “poor little thing,” mentality of low academic expectations. But the often disrupted lives of the children of migrants here is likely to grow still more complicated as the national debate over immigration grows sharper."

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"Immigrant rights groups in Mississippi say that the only way to make sense of the current mess is by understanding the unique economic and labor dynamics in the town, where Howard is the largest employer. In 2008, Howard workers were organized under the IBEW, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. White, black and Latino workers were building capacity so they could head into contract negotiations with a solid worker mandate, according to Bill Chandler, executive director of the Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance. Their union contract expired on August 30, 2008."

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"'I was trying to invert [these stereotypes] so that people would become aware to their own unconscious racism,' said Saliby, who tracks worker abuse on the blog Ethiopian Suicides. He shot the video on a cellphone as part of an interactive workshop run by the producers of Shankaboot, a popular online serial drama."

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"I don’t really celebrate Thanksgiving but many families across the United States will take advantage of deserved days off from work and gather together around tables to give thanks and to break bread. But that turkey (or pernil), how did it get to your kitchen and your table?

"A report released by the Southern Poverty Law Center attempts to answer that question."

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"First, our estimates of the number of private household workers are woefully inaccurate. Individuals who work under the table are unlikely to report their jobs, especially if they are undocumented immigrants. As a result, it’s difficult to estimate precisely the rates of noncompliance with tax reporting requirements. According to Dr. Haskins’s estimates, somewhere between 80 percent and 97 percent of household employers were flouting the law in 2006.

"These workers are among the least likely to apply for unemployment insurance or to show up among the officially unemployed."

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A coalition of labor unions, immigrant advocacy groups and nonprofit organizations in New York announced their support on Friday for newly introduced legislation that would greatly increase penalties against employers that violate minimum-wage and overtime laws. Supporters of the bill, known as the Wage Theft Prevention and Responsible Employer Protection Act, say that wage violations are all too common because penalties for such violations are small under New York law and because employers that break the law face little likelihood of getting caught. The legislation — introduced in the State Senate and State Assembly — would subject employers that fail to pay, for instance, $10,000 in legally required overtime to having to pay twice that amount in damages. That would be above and beyond the $10,000 in back wages that current law already requires such employers to pay.

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