Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 3 of 3 by Latoya Peterson tagged heatlh

"The NIH-commissioned study of 40,069 individual applicants between 2000 and 2006 reported that Asian American or Hispanic researchers were just as likely as whites to receive the new research project grants.
"But it found that blacks were less likely to receive the grants, regardless of education, training, citizenship, country of origin and prior research and publication history.
NIH officials were also disturbed by the small number of applications from non-white applicants. The study found that white applicants far outnumbered those of all other racial/ethnic groups: 28,456 whites (71 percent); 5,402 Asians (13.5 percent); 1,319 Hispanics (3.3 percent); 598 blacks (1.5 percent); and 11 percent were other/unknown."

Share It With Others!

"Individual social factors included education, poverty, health insurance status, employment status and job stress, social support, racism or discrimination, housing conditions and early childhood stressors. Area-level social factors included area-level poverty, income inequality, deteriorating built environment, racial segregation, crime and violence, social capital and availability of open or green spaces.

"The investigators found that approximately 245,000 deaths in the United States in the year 2000 were attributable to low levels of education, 176,000 to racial segregation, 162,000 to low social support, 133,000 to individual-level poverty, 119,000 to income inequality, and 39,000 to area-level poverty."

Share It With Others!

In an open letter, Dr. Raymond Gist, who became the ADA's first African-American president in October, said the dentist group should have done a better job in making sure minorities could join affiliated state and local organizations before the mid-1960s.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT