Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 29 by Latoya Peterson tagged globalization

"Sadly, no one now says “laughter” in Eyak, a language from the Gulf of Alaska, whose last fluent speaker died in 2008, or in the Bo language from the Andaman Islands, for its last remaining speaker, Boa Senior, died in 2010. Nearly 55,000 years of thoughts and ideas—the collective history of an entire people—died with her.

Most tribal languages are disappearing faster than they can be recorded. Linguists at the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages believe that on average, a language is disappearing every two weeks. By 2100, more than half of the more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth—many of them not yet recorded—may disappear. The pace at which they are declining exceeds even that of species extinction."

Share It With Others!

Giving this side-eye on the appropriation of the word "'hood,"--among other reasons--but that's me. Thoughts?--AJP "Pepsi-Cola North America Beverages (PCNAB) is in the 'hood, the South Bronx hood to be precise, teaming up with New Yorkers like Grammy Award producer, rapper, and artist Swizz Beatz, graffiti artist Cope 2, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and Assemblyman Carl Heastie, all gathered in support of healthier lifestyle choices. 'The Bronx community has a special style and swagger,' said Javier Farfan, PepsiCo Cultural Branding Senior Director. 'PCNAB wants to celebrate the community by letting residents know that they can make healthy lifestyle decisions without losing flavor, Bronx flavor.'"

Share It With Others!

"Near the beginning of the piece, Marantz quotes a 2003 Guardian article which states: 'The most marketable skill in India today is the ability to abandon your identity and slip into someone else's.' It's factually correct that this is a marketable skill, but by labeling it the most marketable skill the article is overreaching. It also fails to make a distinction that few Indians overlook. Namely, that there's very little money that a middle class urban Indian can earn by slipping into the identity of, say, a villager in Orissa, or a farmer in rural Nigeria. The marketable skill is the ability to slip into an affluent Westerner's identity.

"By itself, this is a small omission and overgeneralization, but there are similar ones throughout this article, forming a pattern indicative of a lack of awareness or concern for the underlying hierarchies that govern many aspects of a call center employee's life, as well as a lack of nuance."

Share It With Others!

Just in case you missed it in Chris Rock's "Good Hair."--AJP

"'Indian hair is the most sought after for the only reason that it belongs to the same Caucasian race to start with,' said Cherian.

“'And the natural color black matches the hair color of the Africans as well as, when bleached... the color of the Europeans or the Americans.'”

Share It With Others!

"Years before Jamie Oliver did his thing, East Ayrshire, Scotland launched a pilot program called Hungry for Success. That program went far beyond boosting nutrition. It also focused on nutrition education; trained cooks; put organic, local food in school meals; and made the cafeteria a cooler place to hang out.

"So how'd it go over? A Worldwatch Institute report says 67 percent of the town's children said school meals tasted better.

"It was later adopted nationwide, and elements of the program were later picked up by the UK."

Share It With Others!

"'How did we acquire that picture of the lazybones snoozing under the cactus?' said Guadalupe Loaeza, a columnist for Reforma newspaper and author of books about the foibles of Mexico’s rich and famous. 'We know that life is hard every day in our country. That you cannot work one job. You have to have three. You have to work even on the weekends.'”

Share It With Others!

"Women encounter lateness perhaps most sharply, not only because of gendered stigmas against being out of home at night and perceptions of appropriate feminine behavior, but also for more brutal reasons: Nadeem notes the rape and murder of two women in 2005 and 2007, and other attacks on women returning home after late night shifts at call centers. All this suggests a sad, strange story: workers spend their “days” in places completely abstracted from general time, and emerge afterwards into the deep hours of night. The unrelenting monitoring of employees, of course, stops at the door."

Share It With Others!

"So where's the flipside to the story of upward mobility in India? It is the story of poorer India. Primarily agricultural, this India comprises more than 50% of the population but accounts for only 15% of the economy. Life in India's villages is altogether different: it is still concerned with the anxieties of getting two square meals a day. In recent years, while the Indian economy has grown at an average annual rate of 9%, the agricultural sector has grown at 3%. An exponential price rise of 17% in January compared with the same period last year, for food staples that include eggs, fruits, milk and onions, has hurt this section of the population the most."

Share It With Others!

"Small family farms are considered economically "inefficient" because their yields feed their communities and not the global market. But family farms actually have higher productivity per hectare than their larger counterparts. Nevertheless, investment in them has been reduced in the last 20 years in favour of industrial farming."

Share It With Others!

"As resource companies push ever deeper into Australia’s remotest areas, however, Aboriginal leaders are leveraging their rights as traditional landowners to negotiate deals with companies and governments that are seeking to develop their holdings. They say the potential windfall — hundreds of millions of dollars — will rescue their communities from their long dependence on welfare and state subsidies."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT