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Links 1 through 10 of 10 by Latoya Peterson tagged filmmaking

"Comcast has insisted the episode is the result of one rogue communications exec acting in haste and poor judgement. But it’s an apt illustration of the concern media justice advocates have voiced about telecom firms—that they have too much power and have proven themselves willing to abuse it. It’s also brought to the surface a host of perennially difficult questions for struggling community groups. How do you remain true to your politics while accepting (and seeking) funding from a corporation with politics that are at odds with yours? How do you bite the hand that feeds you?"

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"Jones and Antonio say that with just a few million Indians in America, Hollywood doesn’t see big dollar signs when it looks at American Indian films. “That’s always the argument,” says Antonio. “Who are you going to sell it to?” Jones has a rebuttal to that argument, pointing out that there are some 30 million to 40 million people who claim some Indian ancestry.

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"I want to do what Jenkins did: Make a picture about compelling people in situations that captivate, featuring characters our complicated racial past has kept at bay. But I also want to make money. The closest the industry has come to this in recent history was with Precious. That one made money, both at home and abroad. It also happened to have the Tyler Perry and Oprah brands behind it. Even so, it wasn't made by Hollywood. It came up through the festival circuit.

"'It was an example of a film that began at Sundance and then went to Toronto and then, in the marketplace, tracked,' Jenkins says. 'When these movies are actually allowed to perform and are supported properly, I think a lot of these urban legends — these Hollywood legends — they're disproven.'"

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"For years, filmmakers talked about a movie version, but it came about courtesy of Mr. Perry, the writer and director of a successful string of films (and television series) about African-American life that some observers have criticized as clichéd and racially stereotypical. Much of his work has featured Mr. Perry in drag as the saucy matriarch Madea. Ms. Shange said she explicitly told Mr. Perry that Madea could not be in “Colored Girls.”

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"Did Gray have any qualms, I wondered, about setting up a scenario where Butler’s character targets an African American mayor (Viola Davis) for assassination? In a climate where people fret over the safety of our first black president, it’s hard to imagine that Gray wouldn’t have reservations about such a scene.
“'Race never even came into play, 'he said. 'We thought we would hire the strongest candidate for the role [of the mayor], and we did.  We thought it would be different. It had nothing to do with race or politics, and it’s really kind of interesting that people read into it that way.'"

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"This joint event featured a panel discussion exploring contemporary American Indian life, opportunities and challenges for American Indian creative professionals in the entertainment industry, as well as current and future media representations.

“'The first thing we would like you to know is that American Indians are extremely diverse,' Wescott said. 'There are over 500 American Indian tribes. Tonight, we invite you to open the door and see what kind of Native stories you can tell and what kind of Native talent you can use in your projects.'”

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"In Dune, off-worlder Paul Atreides is forced to kill to gain acceptance with the locals when his own kind finally forces him into the wilds. In Avatar, however, Jake only has to show up on a fancy ride. Instead of becoming a nonentity after their earlier aikido warmup, Na'vi chief-to-be Tsu-tey could have drawn a line in the moss: I represent the caution and tradition of my people, and you'll have to beat me down to change and lead us. If Jake has to defeat, even kill an ally who hates him, it tarnishes his character--but Pandora is red in tooth and claw, after all, and it is what he's fighting for."

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"Glover recently told the press that he had difficultly finding financiers to back the film because there were not enough “white heroes.” Glover told Paris’ AFP, "Producers said 'It's a nice project, a great project... where are the white heroes?'" That’s a bit of a strange request considering the film is about the liberation of Haiti, the worlds first free Black republic and the first country in the western hemisphere to abolish slavery."

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The film was written by Vietnamese American writer Vy Vincent Ngo [...] The script was praised for its brilliance by studios but was considered impossible to make, presumably for its dark, sexual, and complex look at an imperfect hero.

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