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Links 1 through 5 of 5 by Latoya Peterson tagged documentaries

"That is part of the gift of Fred's life. He provides an entry point to another aspect of this community. The memory we bring forth as First Nations people is of a time and way of life where LGBTQI folks were accepted. Fred's legacy goes beyond tacit racism and cultural appropriation because it provides us with an opportunity to see each other reflected in a range of common experiences including violence, targeting due to our sexual orientation and gender identity, living in small spaces of safety and being loved by family for who we are. These common experiences should challenge all of us to to see our connection more than our distance and differences. The legacy of Fred's life and the belief in our ancestors shouldn't just live in our memories, it should exist in our every day practice of patience, love, acceptance and non-judgement."

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"But in 1957, when this mezzo-soprano from a small East Texas town was cast opposite a white male student in a University of Texas, Austin, opera production, that was just as controversial. Suddenly Ms. Conrad was thrust into the drama of the larger struggle for civil rights. Her story is now the subject of 'When I Rise,' a documentary scheduled to have its national television premiere on PBS’s 'Independent Lens' on Tuesday night. (Check local listings.)"

"Objecting to Ms. Conrad’s casting, segregationists in the Texas Legislature threatened to withhold state financing from the university. University officials yanked Ms. Conrad from the production — Henry Purcell’s 'Dido and Aeneas' — replacing her with a white student. After the incident made headlines, Harry Belafonte stepped in, promising to pay for Ms. Conrad’s music education anywhere in the world if she chose to leave Texas. Instead, she stayed."

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"Reel Injun is a documentary about the history of Native Americans on film—particularly the ridiculous portrayals in westerns. What was the worst of the worst?"

"In A Man Called Horse an elderly woman’s son dies, and there’s a scene where the Lakota let her freeze to death. She’s wandering around this village in winter—that would never have happened. The Sioux were very communal, they shared food, like when they killed a buffalo they would share it with everybody. So the idea that they’d just let an old woman die—that’s pretty offensive."

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"When you’re doing a documentary film, a lot of this stuff is detective work. So we knew, unlike the first one, we had to go to Mississippi. We knew we had to go to Houston. A lot of those people have found a better way of life, a higher standard of living. And many of those people want to return, but they lived in public housing which was knocked down. You have people who had to evacuate because of mandatory evacuation, and when they come back, now it’s surrounded by barbed wire and they can’t get back in. And the rents have quadrupled since then. And there’s no jobs and they can’t afford to pay their rent. So they can’t come back."

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Thanks mk! New York University will host the “Reel China Biennial Documentary Festival,” Sept. 29-30 and Oct. 7, which will include the screening of films on topics ranging from disability, unemployment, and gay and lesbian lives to the examination ch

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