Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 9 of 9 by Latoya Peterson tagged disability

"In the United States, some of the most blatant examples of the racialization of mental illness come from within the black community. Historically, diagnoses like “drapetomania” (“this troublesome practice that many [slaves] have of running away”) and hebetude (“laziness”) were used to pathologize the behavior of people held in slavery. Clearly no person would have a reason to flee slavery, or to experience depression while being held in slavery, so it must have been the result of disease.

With the end of slavery came new diagnostic weapons to use against black men and women; for example, schizophrenia diagnoses are much higher among the black community, particularly among men. This is not, researchers believe, because members of this community are at any particular increased risk of schizophrenia."

Share It With Others!

"It’s a bit of a shock to hear all those slurs popped out in a row and not everyone’s loved the PSA for exactly that reason. But derogatory language, if not these explicit slurs, abounds on television and in daily life. The r-word, I’d add, is not the only derogatory slur that compassionate, thinking people should consider dropping from their lexicon.

"The real question, it seems, is whether or not it’s okay to compare one derogatory slur with another, which can often feel too much like equating the suffering of one group with another. In the end though, the PSA is meant to create awareness about a word that’s hurtful to people who are disabled, and those who care about them."

Share It With Others!

"African American boys who are suspended at double and triple the rates of their white male peers. English language learners who, for years, remain in separate classes, falling behind their peers and scoring poorly on standardized tests. Disabled students and those with illnesses who are shortchanged at school because of their impairments."

Share It With Others!

"My interlocutor poked me: “Your mama white?” All thoughts of positive interaction slipped beyond my grasp. I knew that we weren’t actually talking about race and yet. Yet, I answered her question literally. My English accent returning more strongly than usual, I talked about my white father and my Afro-Caribbean mother; I spoke bitterly about the loss of Spanish and Creole-speaking family members and English as the language of acceptance. I gave her the history full and square. “Now,” I demanded, “do you think of me as white?”

The woman shrugged: “Just thought, because of the ….” and pointed to my wheelchair."

Share It With Others!

"Amanda Palmer, who, for some reason, gets carte blanche to do things such as:

* Write long blog posts that don’t actually address any of the critiques raised and instead contain classic dodges like “I’m sorry that you were offended.”
* Make fun of her critics’ very existence on Australian television. (DISABLED FEMINISTS HAR HAR HAR SOOO FUNNY U GUYZ!!11)
* Say that she’s been “crucified” by these same critics.
* Leave several ill-advised 140-character “responses” on Twitter.

Throughout all of this, you are still the one who is Too Sensitive To Be On the Internet. And even if you’ve made it pretty clear that you are a fan of the person you are criticizing — as I did — you’ll still be portrayed as a hater."

Share It With Others!

"Johnson, who was born with a neuromuscular disease, drew national attention for her opposition to "the charity mentality" and "pity-based tactics" of the annual Jerry Lewis muscular dystrophy telethon."

Share It With Others!

"The U.S. discriminates against blind people by printing paper money that makes it impossible for them to distinguish the bills' value, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday."

Share It With Others!

"What do we gain by consistently characterizing a disabled person's ability to function "despite" her disability as a "despite" rather than a "with?" What lies behind that need to see a disability as an obstacle rather than a form of human variation?"

Share It With Others!

"We all use disablist or ableist metaphorical language, and I bet most of us say something that is potentially offensive every day: we might be blind to this, deaf to that, pass disabled vehicles, chat about being paralyzed in a situation, etc., etc."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT