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Links 1 through 10 of 30 by Latoya Peterson tagged colorism

"Called "The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders," the study found a group of Villanova professors assessing the sentences of more than 12,000 black female defendants in North Carolina. Their findings were horrifying: Even after controlling for things like prior convictions, crime severity, and thinness, women with light skin received sentences that were 12 percent shorter on average than dark-skinned women. Lighter women also had their actual time served reduced by about 11 percent."

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"It all started on twitter with #teamlightskin vs #teamdarkskin. Now club promoters have decided to make a party around it. The flyer reads “Most Anticipated Party Of The Year” “Light Skin vs Dark Skin Party”. I’m not so sure this is the most anticipated party of the year but it does have the most controversial theme. It seems like the Good Hair Bad Hair scene from the Spike Lee film “School Daze” is coming to life..."

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"Brit Naz Humphreys, who has Pakistani heritage, told the Waikato Times: "It's 2010 and I still can't believe I'm being discriminated against because I have brown skin. The casting manager basically said they weren't having anybody who wasn't pale-skinned.'

"According to AFP, there is video footage that shows the casting manager telling people at the audition: 'We are looking for light-skinned people. I'm not trying to be... whatever. It's just the brief. You've got to look like a hobbit.'"

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"As I got older, it became increasingly more important to me to fit the norm of what it meant to 'look Black.' I remember when I was ten years old I begged and begged my mother to comb my hair with five braids instead of my usual one long ponytail. I wanted one braid in front, two on the sides and two in the back, just the way all the other little Black girls wore their hair. First off, my mother had five girls with long hair to comb for school in the morning. I had to wait last as she hurriedly combed my sisters’ hair and then gave me the five braids I requested. As soon as she finished combing my hair, I rushed to the mirror to take a look. Wow, I thought. I look just like a Black girl. Surely, the other little Black girls will like me better now. Instead, when I arrived at school, I was met with anger and resentment. Crossed arms and cruel eyes peered at me like I had stole something and should confess and give it back."

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"What is interesting is, how a few people have managed to use this 'duskiness' attributed to their skin to their advantage, or that is what the media would have us believe. This is why we think Nandita Das is such a 'good actor' because a lot of producers and directors initially rejected her because of her skin colour so she could dedicate herself to 'indie' and 'experimental films', not because she initially might have had no say over what projects she took on. Because Bipasha Bau is 'dusky', she has become the new-age sex-bomb of Indian cinema. Not because she has spent years perfecting and crafting that persona or anything."

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"However, in the New Immigrant Survey used in this study, participants were not given the option of choosing "some other race."

As a result, in the New Immigrant Survey, more than three-quarters of respondents (79 percent) identified themselves as white, regardless of their skin color.

"This shows that Latino immigrants do recognize the advantages of a white racial identity. Most are attempting to push the boundaries of whiteness to include them, even if their skin color is darker," Frank said."

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While some fans will be happy to see a female character unveiled at least, supporters of Racebending.com have expressed disappointment because an action figure from the show would have been a rare toy featuring a character of color, while the movie figurine of Katara is white...Most of the action figures seemed to have suffered further discoloration, with Zuko’s action figure sporting lightened skin and Aang’s skin appearing jaundiced.

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"Last year, minorities filed a record number of color-bias complaints, specifically addressing skin-tone discrimination. Over the last two decades, the number of claims rose to 2,949 in 2009 from fewer than 400 in 1992, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission reported. They represent a small percentage of the more than 93,000 discrimination complaints filed last year. While most cases involve minorities discriminating against each other for being too light or too dark, most often within the same racial group, there also are cases where whites were found to have discriminated against minorities on that basis. Federal law distinguishes race and color discrimination but they often overlap, officials said."

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"This isn’t racism, per se: it’s colorism, an unconscious prejudice that isn’t focused on a single group like blacks so much as on blackness itself. Our brains, shaped by culture and history, create intricate caste hierarchies that privilege those who are physically and culturally whiter and punish those who are darker.

"Colorism is an intraracial problem as well as an interracial problem. Racial minorities who are alert to white-black or white-brown issues often remain silent about a colorism that asks 'how black' or 'how brown' someone is within their own communities."

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"This past Memorial Day, I opened the medicine cabinet at my aunt’s house looking for toothpaste only to find a tube of Fair & Lovely staring back at me. My heart sank. I yelled for my 10-year old cousin. “What is THIS?” I asked her, holding the tube gingerly.

“What?” she said innocently, “It’s just suntan lotion so I don’t get dark.” I looked at the ingredient list. Indeed, among the ingredients was “sunscreen.” I shouldn’t have been surprised. This was the same girl who had teased her seven-year old darker-skinned cousin so much that a year later, the poor kid still adamantly states “I’m not pretty.” Little wonder given that our mothers come from a country where bridal makeup still means you pancake the woman in white foundation from the neck-up and then hide her hands under her dupatta so the color disparity doesn’t show."

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