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Links 1 through 10 of 99 by Latoya Peterson tagged class

The importance of radio battery life in prison communities cannot be overstated; the devices are relied on for more than listening to music, hearing about local news and weather, and watching television (TV sets in common areas often use transmitters to broadcast sound on a dedicated frequency). A study conducted at San Vittore prison in Milan, Italy, found that “in a place where privacy is constantly denied, radio becomes a vital tool for building and maintaining one’s private self.” Some inmates even had a term for using their radio to create a bubble of personal space: “I headphone myself,” one said.

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"When a service call would come in, we would ask, “Does he sound white or black?” If it was the former, I would bid the job. If the latter, my boss would. Detroit is one of the most segregated metro areas in the nation, and for the first time I was getting what it felt like to be on the other side of that line. In contrast to the abstract verbal yoga students at the University of Michigan would perform when speaking about race, this was refreshing. And terrifying. I couldn’t hide behind fancy words any longer."

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"Such parents are certainly more disadvantaged than suburban parents, but that's not the point: To be demonstrably superior, selective charter school students should outperform comparable students in regular schools. Perhaps they do, but that has yet to be shown. And there is now considerable evidence that both KIPP and the Success Academies have high attrition rates. Students who don't succeed are encouraged or required to return to regular schools. For selective charter schools, this may not be bad policy, but it vitiates comparisons with regular neighborhood schools that must take all comers, including students who rebel against learning, those with expensive and difficult-to-treat disabilities, and those who flunk out of charters."

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"Mark Kuller, owner of Estadio and Proof (City Paper's pick for D.C.'s "Best Restaurant" this year), set-off a shitstorm of debate with his comments in a recent Examiner story about Friday's city-sponsored youth event in Chinatown. The quote, as it appeared in the article: "[I]t’s a mistake to have a youth engagement event in this area. The police have tried to disperse the crowds in London, too. If you don’t think that can happen in the U.S., you’re wrong.”

"The blog Greater Greater Washington even encouraged folks to boycott Kuller's popular restaurant as a result of that remark."

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"Media attention has focused, understandably enough, on the "nouveau poor" -- formerly middle and even upper-middle class people who lost their jobs, their homes, and/or their investments in the financial crisis of 2008 and the economic downturn that followed it, but the brunt of the recession has been borne by the blue-collar working class, which had already been sliding downwards since de-industrialization began in the 1980s.

"In 2008 and 2009, for example, blue-collar unemployment was increasing three times as fast as white-collar unemployment, and African American and Latino workers were three times as likely to be unemployed as white workers. Low-wage blue-collar workers, like the people I worked with in this book, were especially hard hit for the simple reason that they had so few assets and savings to fall back on as jobs disappeared."

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"London -- and England -- is now dealing with black kids, white kids and indeed most likely children from other ethnicities who all have their axes to grind, who feel victimized and oppressed and excluded in their own country with few opportunities. With no place to go to, nowhere for their voices to be heard, violence seems an easy answer. With a media looking for its next juicy story and instantaneous, free communication tools at hand -- it has been reported that Blackberry Messenger has been the main organizing tool for the riots, and it has allowed the quick spread of the violence from place to place -- suddenly the previously disenfranchised now have some power, destructive as it may be."

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"Last month, on July 20th, little Lauren Olamina turned two. Yes, knowing the birthday of a literary character is a nugget of useless knowledge only appropriate for cocktail parties and Twitter updates. But it’s also what makes today’s news that much more interesting. As the center of Octavia Butler’s Parable series, the world Lauren Olamina inhabits is revealed to the reader through her diary entries. Her world is a United States on the brink of utter collapse...we meet Lauren in July of 2024, when she is fifteen and living in a fortified community just outside of Los Angeles. The paucity of resources such as jobs, food, water, and other civil services has resulted in near anarchy for those living outside of the neighborhood’s fences. 

"The world Butler’s most compelling heroine inhabit...is delineated as a future, fictional world that our current, real world seems unequivocally committed to seeing come to actual fruition. Don’t believe me? Just listen closely to Robert and Michele.

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"The easy answer is that the disparity in coverage is about race and class. Media critics argue that if Caylee had been black, her disappearance and death would never have received as much attention. There were indeed sharp contrasts: Caylee, white, from a middle-income home in suburban Orlando, in the shadow of Disney World; the Jacks sisters, black, from a lower-income Southeast Washington neighborhood besieged by drugs and crime, just blocks from the Capitol."

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"About two thirds of students graduating with four-year degrees recently did so with loans hanging over their heads, and their average bill comes in at a whopping $23,186, according to FinAid.org. Of those, Kantrowitz estimates that about half will still be repaying their loans in 20 years -- the traditional student loan period. And for many, that may very well mean they won't be able to buy a home, save for retirement or fund the next generation's education."

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"There are moments when I don’t like my kids very much, but I can’t fathom hating one’s child. But you know what I really do hate? The words we use to describe children like the one that Arnold Schwarzenegger announced he’d fathered. Children who didn’t ask to be born, and who most certainly didn’t choose the circumstances of their births. A Twitter friend, @JBeezy007, commented: 'Most people think of the word 'bastard' as a profanity, but back in the day, it meant a ‘Love Child’…It still does.' And vice versa, of course. Funny how Arnold Schwarzenegger has a 'love child,' but when poor single parents have children, they are labeled 'out of wedlock.' I know that the definitions aren’t identical, but 'love child' is certainly the more sentimental of the two. But there’s nothing sentimental about it when everyone knows it’s just a Hollywood way of calling a child a 'bastard.' And from a kid’s perspective, you just want to be a child, without any qualifiers."

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