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Links 1 through 5 of 5 by Latoya Peterson tagged cities

"California is ranked 16th in the nation in the report’s Pedestrian Danger Index, and this danger is primarily shouldered by non-whites and people over 65. Hispanic pedestrians have a 97 percent higher chance of being killed by cars than non-Hispanic whites, and African Americans have an 83 percent higher pedestrian death rate than non-Hispanic whites in the state, according to the report.

"The reasons for this imbalance are varied. In many cases, fatalities are blamed on poor roads and infrastructure, which is often a particularly pronounced problem in poorer ethnic neighborhoods. Nearly 40 percent of fatalities occur where no crosswalk is available."

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"The whole financing system of culture is wrong in this city – all the money is here and not where the art is born. The organisers make out that this bit of Sao Paulo is an explosion of culture but it's not really like that. People in the favelas are not being helped at all, and that is where most the real creativity is going on. I'm afraid Sao Paulo will get [to be] like many African cities: big and rich in the centre with very, very poor people around the edges. This is what I see now in Sao Paulo."

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"So what makes New York a more complementary fit for her than her hometown? Maybe that has something to do with the creative economy, a concept much discussed by 'urban expert' Richard Florida in his book 'Who’s Your City: How the Creative Economy is Making the Place Where You Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life,' which explored an interesting pattern of how one’s city environment influences productivity and creativity.

"When applied to the Black experience, will analyzing the creative economies explain why cities like Brooklyn or Philadelphia produce so many musical artists or why Atlanta has such a high percentage of Black entrepreneurs? According to the social theory, location is critical whether you know it or not. It’s not only about infrastructure and city government but also about the atmosphere created by people themselves. For many Blacks, just having a presence within a city is a major element."

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"Arab Americans might even make Detroit a global crossroads. As Miami has become a link between the Americas and as San Francisco and Seattle have connected the U.S. with Asian countries, so Detroit has become a conduit to the Muslim world, notes the 2007 Wayne State University study of the Detroit community. You can already find that potential in small notices. On the website ArabDetroit.com, a linguistics company posts help-wanted ads to recruit translators from the local population to help the U.S. military in Iraq: 'Together,' reads the ad, wwe can rebuild a nation, heal communities ...'"

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"Usually, ethnic neighborhoods are shown as homogeneous, sharply bounded swathes of color. But obviously, living in a city tells a much different story -- and the nature of the boundary areas are at least as important to the identity of any city as the so-called ethnic centers."

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