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Links 1 through 3 of 3 by Latoya Peterson tagged census2010

"The new narrative comes from the ethnoburbs, a term coined in a 2009 book by Arizona State University professor Wei Li to describe entire cities dominated by a nonwhite ethnic group. They are suburban in look, but urban in political, culinary and educational values, attracting immigrants with advanced degrees and ready business skills."

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"...the bureau has never made it easy to recognize the indigenous roots of 'Mexican Americans/Chicanos' or 'Latinos/Hispanics.' The long and sordid history of the census has been to direct or redirect them into the white category, even--and especially--when they have asserted their indigenous roots or when they have checked the 'other' race category. (Since 1980, about half of Hispanics/Latinos have checked the “other” race category and are virtually the only group that chooses this category.) This has been a standard practice of the bureau since the second half of the twentieth century. Coincidentally, this is also when government bureaucrats imposed the term 'Hispanic,' a tag that generally masks the existence of indigenous and/or African roots in many peoples of the Americas."

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Identify yourself as being of ''Hispanic, Latino or Spanish origin'' on the 2010 U.S. Census questionnaire, and you will get to be more specific about your ancestry, such as Mexican-American, Cuban or Puerto Rican. But check the box for ''black, African-American or Negro'' and there will be no place to show whether you trace your identity to the African continent, a Caribbean island or a pre-Civil War plantation. Some Caribbean-American leaders are urging their communities to write their nationalities on the line under ''some other race'' on the forms arriving in mailboxes next month, along with checking the racial categories they feel identify them best. It's another step in the evolution of the Census, which has moved well beyond general categories like ''black'' and ''white'' to allow people to identify themselves as multi-racial, and, in some cases, by national origin.

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