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Links 1 through 10 of 18 by Latoya Peterson tagged cartoon

"But the creators finally fixed on doe-eyed Dora Marquez, who kicked off the first show with three simple words: 'Hi, I'm Dora.' Dora began traveling through the jungle — speaking bits of Spanish along the way — and onto the nation's television screens in August 2000.

"The idea was to foster pride among Latino children and familiarity with Latino culture among English speakers, but only indirectly as part of an entertainment show.

"Amid these warm-hearted adventures, Dora became a pop-culture superstar, a lucrative franchise and a force that helped shift the globalized juvenile television landscape that has become increasingly multicultural and bilingual. Dora, in some eyes, also became a poster child for immigration and the target of anti-immigrant sentiment."

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"According to Nickelodeon, Dora was originally created in reaction to the underrepresentation of Latinos in the media. In response to the defamation of Dora in these images, Nickelodeon has taken a neutral stance, calling her a “citizen of the world” and that her home is not in any one place. Whether she was created to be a representation in America or not, it has happened. At such a fragile time in our nation’s history, when an innocent cartoon character is defaced all in the name of hatred, Nickelodeon, her creator, should stand against this behavior - for Dora and for all. We’re thinking a new episode is in order."

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"The thing is, in spite of all the corporate bullshit, Pixar has proven their unfailing loyalty to the story and the characters. Disney, on the other hand, has proven its unfailing loyalty to the *genre*."

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"In [the Variety Article], various Cartoon Net[work] execs try to justify their new perversion by explaining that the network “has a strength with boys” and that they want to rebuild themselves as “the home for boys.”

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"the mayor ignores his 96 daughters in order to groom his uninterested son to become mayor. Why doesn’t he groom one of his much more enthusiastic daughters? And, of course, it is the brooding son who, in the end, saves the entire world of Whoville."

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"the show is about a trio of kung fu kickin' chickens—Chick P, KO Joe and Chuckie Chan...Ugh. Expect lots of wonderfully stereotypical Asian imagery."

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"Rumor has it the higher ups at BET have been pressuring Sony behind the scenes for months to yank the episodes, including threatening legal action."

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"This cartoon is a couple of week old, but it's still worth mentioning... what really gets me is that the cartoon conflates the questionable safety of food from China with Chinese restaurants in America."

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"Black Entertainment Television is not known as a popular source for animated programs, but the network is trying to change that with releases featuring the voices of actors Vin Diesel and Orlando Jones."

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""Thank you, come again!" Sadly, that catchphrase...are such common ethnic slurs in America, actor Kal Penn reclaimed it with bitter irony in the hit comedy Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle. Among desis, at least, it was met with applause."

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