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Links 1 through 10 of 50 by Latoya Peterson tagged business

God bless America, indeed.--AJP

"Republican City Councilmen Dan Halloran and Peter Koo are drafting legislation that would require store signs in the city to be mostly in English. They say police officers and firefighters need to be able to quickly identify stores.
"The change also would protect consumers and allow local shops to expand outside their traditional customer base, the council members argue. But merchants say it would be an unnecessary and costly burden on small businesses and would homogenize diverse pockets of the city that cater mostly to immigrant residents."

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But you knew this, Racializens.--AJP

"The report found that there was a strong correlation between social inclusion, competitiveness and economic development, and argued that 'prejudice, in whatever form – including racism, sexism, homophobia, religious intolerance – irrationally destroys the value of human capital.'

"'Hypothetically, what would happen if the secret of energy efficiency, or to greater food productivity is locked up in the mind of somebody who is denied the ability to develop because of their race or their religious beliefs or their sexual orientation? That's the sort challenge that we now face,' Donovan said."

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"HB 56 contains a few especially harsh provisions. Under the current bill, undocumented immigrants who enter into any kind of contract would not be able to have the contract enforced because of the immigration status. And in a new twist on the attack on immigrants’ education rights, primary and secondary schools will be required to verify the immigration status of students and parents, who will be required to go to their children’s schools to provide an affidavit. The bill also would bar undocumented immigrant students from enrolling in any of Alabama’s public colleges and universities.
"Gov. Robert Bentley signed HB 56 into law [this morning], the Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice confirms. The law is set to go into effect September 1. Immigrant and civil rights groups have vowed to file legal challenges against the new law before then.

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"It’s as though you’ve flown into El Paso or Nogales, and you could spend days without uttering a word of English, getting by quite well with a mastery of Spanish. Signs, advertising, clerks and waiters in these businesses speak the language, many with limited knowledge of English. It’s no different from the ethnic neighborhoods of New York City or Chicago, where Yiddish, Polish and Italian once dominated. Yet the sounds of Spanish or any foreign language create a sense of foreboding for some merchants who lack an historical perspective. Many fail to realize that by the second and third generations of the immigrant experience, English is fluently spoken, and the native tongue is mostly forgotten. But it’s that existential uncertainty that contributes to the reluctance of some Southern Nevada business operators to effectively reach this market."

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"Much like City Journal did six months ago, the Times takes a broad look at the Korean deli phenomenon, which started in the '70s and spread far and wide in NYC, often providing the only source for fresh produce and food in low-income neighborhoods. They sometimes provided racial tension, too; in 1990 black demonstrators boycotted the Family Red Apple store on Church Avenue in Brooklyn because they said the owners had been "hostile" toward them.

"And unlike other immigrant groups, the second generation hasn't generally taken over the family business."

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"The ACLU is calling for an outside investigation into a shootout in the streets of Miami Beach early Monday morning, which ended in the death of one alleged gunman, but which also left three officers and four bystanders wounded — the latter possibly hit by stray police bullets. The incident comes as a grim conclusion to Miami’s tenth annual Urban Beach Week, a massively popular Memorial Day Weekend event that attracts racially coded criticism and police scrutiny in equal measure."

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"Comcast has insisted the episode is the result of one rogue communications exec acting in haste and poor judgement. But it’s an apt illustration of the concern media justice advocates have voiced about telecom firms—that they have too much power and have proven themselves willing to abuse it. It’s also brought to the surface a host of perennially difficult questions for struggling community groups. How do you remain true to your politics while accepting (and seeking) funding from a corporation with politics that are at odds with yours? How do you bite the hand that feeds you?"

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"On some nights, Univision -- the nation's fifth largest television network -- glides past fourth-place NBC and other established broadcast networks among younger demographic groups in the ratings. And unlike the major broadcasters, which are struggling to hold onto their audiences in an increasingly fragmented media universe, Univision's prime-time viewership has increased about 8% from last season."

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"This ideal mix of economic gains while being with family - when compared with the recession-struck US and its chain of immigration pains - makes the pastures at home, temptingly green. 'America is soon going to be importing innovation from India and China. We are now exporting all that goodness,'" says Vivek Wadhwa, an entrepreneur-turned-academic, who co-authored the report.

"'It's hard to put a date on when this reverse brain drain began, but it accelerated when we went into recession because these emerging economies were not really impacted,' says Robert Litan, VP - research and policy at the Kauffman Foundation. 'It's not a brain drain, but a hemorrhage,' exclaims Wadhwa. 'Flawed US immigration policies along with opportunities in India and China have hastened this trend.'"

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"In recent years, there have also been accusations from the braiding community that governments were unfairly targeting the African art. In 2006, a Philadelphia law requiring hair braiders to get special licenses spurred debate over the plight of immigrant braiders, many of whom came to America with little money and often don't speak English, a skill they would likely need to get through certification."

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