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Links 1 through 3 of 3 by Latoya Peterson tagged baseball

"White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen thinks Asian players are given privileges in the United States that Latinos are not afforded.

"In his latest rant, the outspoken Guillen also said he's the "only one" in baseball teaching young players from Latin America to stay away from performance-enhancing drugs and that Major League Baseball doesn't care about that."

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"Bryant confirms what one sensed at the time, that Aaron approached [his goal of 3,000 hits] more as grim chore than joyous mission. To a teenage fan like me, the long siege, spanning several seasons, felt exhausting. Even as I rooted for Aaron, counting each home run, I yearned for it to end, in particular the racist abuse. It was well known that as each fresh trophy was being shipped to Cooperstown, Aaron was hoarding his own, much darker souvenirs, the torrent of hate letters, including no small number, Bryant acerbically reports, “from his fellow Americans, guaranteeing his death should he continue the quest.” That he was pursuing it in Dixie only heightened the pressure. He was given the protection of a “two-man personal security force,” and the F.B.I. kept watch. Three decades later it still pained him, Bryant writes, to recall “how a piece of his life had been taken from him and how it had never come back.” It was one of baseball’s ugliest passages."

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"This absorbing account of his life also reminds us that the picture was more complicated. Clemente faced discrimination, suspicion and ridicule through much of his career; he was a moody, private and sensitive man who had a tense relationship with the pr

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