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Links 1 through 10 of 10 by Latoya Peterson tagged assimilation

Usually, I'd blow off Erin Aubrey Kaplan. But this op-ed may be a step up for her. --AJP

"But putting aside the question of whether Obama is in a position to do much of anything, can principles of assimilation and black unity coexist at the top? Can they coexist at all? The big unstated fear among many blacks, including West, is that Obama will turn out to be yet another disappointing black politician, one who readily articulates the needs of those at the bottom but doesn't ultimately address them. That's a crisis of another color."

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"Many immigrants and second-generation Americans go by nicknames rather than their legal names for a number of reasons. I’m one such example. I grew up up in a small, rural and mostly-white Maryland town, and my parents decided I should go by the nickname Ele rather than my real, very Persian name: Elahe, the Arabic word for goddess (pronounced Eh-la-heh). They went by 'Americanized' names themselves in an effort to make life easier, to assimilate as quickly as possible in a foreign land. And for 21 years, I was Ele (pronounced Elie). It wasn’t until after college that I decided to make the switch to my real name, both in my personal and professional worlds.

"My decision was like Ismail’s; why must I accommodate or change my identity to convenience others or make them feel more comfortable?"

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"Africans experienced racism daily, said Dr Ahmed, a refugee from Eritrea who arrived in Australia in 1987. ''Australia has a black history with black people, and Africans coming with a black skin, they are just copping that sort of Aboriginal black treatment.

"'We should have been ambassadors of change and acceptance for blackness. The system still has a problem accepting that blackness.' Australia has a history of failure on blackness, he argued, 'and that's what's halting Africans in their settlement'".

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"You may remember that Boroz previously demanded that a full line of foods encompassing “all ethnic groups” be available. So how is that 50-50 thing going to work? How would you determine that 50 percent of your vegetables are Asian? And will Chinese people be allowed to purchase Oreos?

Boroz additionally had these complaints:

After visiting the store, Boroz said too many of its products are Chinese, the deli is insufficient and many of the products’ packages do not have English translations.

How many of the “American” products have Chinese translations? Since we’re being all 50-50 here.

As somebody who cannot read much Chinese, I haven’t had any real difficulty in the Chinese grocery store. I can’t think of anything that didn’t have an English label. But if I didn’t know what it was, I probably wouldn’t buy it anyway."food

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This is a take down of the Elizabeth Moon essay that sparked a problem at Wiscon, a feminist focused con that is still struggling with inclusion issues. Moon was invited as the guest of honor, but this is a take down of her screed against Muslims/immigrants. - LDP

"Saying that a group has "the traits of good people" is a direct linguistic claim that they are not, inherently, good people. Saying that Muslims have "the virtues of civilized people" says that they aren't actually civilized; they just share those "virtues," whatever they happen to be. And limiting the claim to "many Muslims" goes further into the previous statement… allows her to imply, without claiming, that the majority of Muslims are not civilized, lack virtues, and are not admirable."

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"Fazel — or as he would prefer to be known, Fajnzylber — is one of an increasing number of French Jews trying to persuade France's State Council to allow them to return to the family names their parents and grandparents gave up when they arrived here after World War II."

"A portion of the French civil code adopted after the war stipulates that family names are 'immutable' and must be continued. The civil code allows 'foreign sounding' names to be changed to those considered more French-like, but declares the 'impossibility' of reverting."

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"Man Ray had practical reasons to assimilate. Early in his career Fascism was on the rise, and Jewish artists were routinely ghettoized by critics, peers and the art market. But as this show reveals, Man Ray’s self-effacement was obsessive. He made a sport of trying to conceal his background, even late in life when he had achieved artistic recognition. When he wrote his selective autobiography, “Self-Portrait” (1963), he left out nearly all the dates."

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"Judaism’s not solely a religion. It’s not a politician’s demographic category, either, equivalent to “Muslim” and “Christian.” It can be a social condition, an intellectual persuasion, a subset of a community."

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"He’s a living symbol of how America looks at a biracial kid,” Leo Butler, director of diversity at NFA, said. “To people, he’s black, period.”

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"'So conform to it; or don't come here. We don't want the hate-mongers, whatever their race, religion or creed.'...Mr Blair also announced a crackdown on funding for religious and racial groups, saying in the future they would have to prove they aimed to

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