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Links 1 through 10 of 32 by Latoya Peterson tagged art

"Almost four decades later, the same museum the collective defaced because its doors weren’t open to artists of their kind — Mexican-American, working class and poor, highly irreverent and politicized — is not just finally welcoming them inside but rolling out a red carpet for the occasion."

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"The nation's first black president has hung a painting with the N-word outside the Oval Office, in a nod to the civil rights movement, reports Politico. President Obama last month had Norman Rockwell's "The Problem We All Live With" installed in the White House; the painting shows a black child, 6-year-old Ruby Bridges, en route to her newly integrated New Orleans school as the wall behind her shows graffiti including the racial epithet and "KKK," as well as a splattered tomato."

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"The project has skeptics. Some see her as an artistic carpetbagger; before moving to Queens, she had never visited the borough, except for her own shows at MoMA PS1. Others say that her plans for social change sound naïve, and that her unusual living arrangement can be dismissed as a stunt.

“'Being able to hit the eject button at any time changes the experience in a dramatic way,' said Andrew Friedman, co-executive director of Make the Road New York, an immigrant advocacy group in Queens. 'I tend to be kind of allergic to the heroics of it.'”

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"Black chose eight locations on the University of Winnipeg campus to display about 120 red dresses donated by people from many different cultures. The effect is simply stunning: Despite a very busy and noisy background of 9,000 students, they are so well positioned that they cannot be missed. The dresses just hang there, clothing with no bodies, creating an intense discomfort in the viewers. Visitors are left silent, unable to keep their eyes off the dresses, almost scared that moving around them could wake up some angry spirit.

"The color red also works perfectly here. Beyond its obvious meanings − blood, sexual energy and violence − there is also the blatant reminder that Canada remains a white-centered, male-dominated society that constantly tries to dehumanize Aboriginal women, and break their inner strength."

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"As a whole, the second study suggested, newer generations are not significantly less inclined toward the arts ― instead, there just aren’t enough of them to go around. A much bigger problem, the analysis contends, is the dwindling, for reasons that are not clear-cut, of a specific kind of arts fan: the “omnivore” who relishes a wide range of attractions and attends far more frequently than others, accounting for nearly 60 percent of arts admissions.

"The education study found that declines began with the generation that began school in 1972, coinciding with reductions in school budgets and the “back to basics” educational movement."

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**TRIGGER WARNING**
"'Well several people I know who had never mentioned the issue of childhood sexual abuse before said, ‘But Shantrelle, this happens to black boys, too!’ And I had to say, ‘I’m curating this exhibit, and it’s about black girls. If other people want to curate another exhibit about black boys, they can do that.' The fact is: I will never demonize black men, under any circumstances. I grew up in a family full of incredible black fathers, brothers, uncles and cousins, and I know the types of issues and oppression [black men] deal with, like being harassed by the police and being [sexually] abused themselves. But we still have to hold black men who abuse black girls accountable for that abuse.'"

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"The murals are part of a collection of eight works painted by George Beattie in 1956 depicting an idealized version of Georgia farming, from the corn grown by prehistoric American Indians to a 20th-century veterinary lab. In the Deep South, the history in between includes the use of slave labor.

"'I don't like those pictures,' said Republican Gary Black, the newly elected agriculture commissioner. 'There are a lot of other people who don't like them.'"

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"The title he chose added yet another unorthodox layer in the form of political content. In 1925 the African-American philosopher Alain Locke, a shaper of the Harlem Renaissance, told black artists to advance themselves by adopting modernist forms that would move them beyond racial stereotypes. Mr. Bradford’s art takes Locke’s idea and flips it around by creating modernist abstraction from everyday materials of black culture."

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"For today’s love we thought we’d recognize a couple of phenomenally successful Asian and Asian American artists who we think are more than qualified for future awards which recognize a set of people who, as Kennedy Center Chair David Rubenstein said, 'have spent their lives enriching, inspiring and elevating the cultural vibrancy of our nation and the world.'

"For starters, we think very highly of Maya Lin, the artist and architect most famous for designing the Vietname Veterans’ War Memorial in Washington, D.C. thirty years ago while still in art school. Since then she’s gone on to a successful career in architecture, but has also fit in the kinds of monuments that memorialize, but never enshrine, this country’s political history. Lin also designed the Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama. President Obama clearly already knows how talented Lin is. He awarded her a Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009."

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"Hester's portrait forms part of an exhibition depicting 200 of the hundreds of women who have been murdered or declared missing in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juarez since the early 1990s.

"Over the past five years, Ciudad Juarez has been in the news for the violence and havoc caused by Mexico's drugs cartels.

"But the murder of these women is largely unrelated and pre-dates the country's drugs war.

"Because almost all the women are 'extremely poor' they are 'seen as inconsequential,' according to Tamsyn Challenger."

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