Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 98 by Latoya Peterson tagged activism

"This is life now for El General. This time last year, he was a 21-year-old university student. He was a big Tupac fan who'd recorded his own raps and posted them online, but even within the microscopic universe of Tunisian rap, hardly anyone knew who he was. Then, on November 7, 2010, he uploaded a song called "Rais Lebled" to Facebook. The date was significant: In Tunisia, November 7 was a national holiday commemorating the moment in 1987 when Prime Minister Zine El Abidine Ben Ali ended the 30-year reign of the previous president, Habib Bourguiba, with a bloodless coup. The song, whose title loosely translates as "President of the Country," is hardly a celebration: Over an eerie synth line and a simple, harrowing beat, El General searingly indicts Ben Ali. "Mr. President, your people are dying," he rhymes in rough, angry Tunisian Arabic. "They are eating garbage." He goes on to rail against police brutality, anti-Islamic policies, and institutionalized kleptocracy."

Share It With Others!

"Members of the Jena Six are determined to move away – and learn – from their controversial pasts. They say they want to be something one day: A sports agent, a lawyer, a military man. Those interviewed said they don't run into problems when they return to Jena to visit family.

"I've tried to wash those memories out of the back of my head," said Jessie Ray Beard, who was 14 when he was arrested in the beating. "I have other things to concentrate on."

Share It With Others!

"The nation's first black president has hung a painting with the N-word outside the Oval Office, in a nod to the civil rights movement, reports Politico. President Obama last month had Norman Rockwell's "The Problem We All Live With" installed in the White House; the painting shows a black child, 6-year-old Ruby Bridges, en route to her newly integrated New Orleans school as the wall behind her shows graffiti including the racial epithet and "KKK," as well as a splattered tomato."

Share It With Others!

Check the visual. - LDP "Anti-racist activists snuck trick t-shirts into a music festival with a large neo-Nazi turnout; the shirts bore a crypto-racist slogan that faded on first washing to reveal a plea to reconsider "militant right-wing lifestyle."

Share It With Others!

"Women delegates will meet to share their experiences in the resistance and the situation in their communities and within their own organizations, said Cárceres. This will enable them to better articulate strategies 'to support the struggle not only against capitalism but also against racism and patriarchy...' And making these connections requires going beyond reports of ongoing violations of indigenous and women’s human rights today to examine the patriarchal roots of colonialism and neoliberalism that have provided historical precedents and current strategies for the ongoing repression of indigenous and Afro peoples. 'This is part of the history of the resistence that we as indigenous and Afro-Honduran women continue to develop,' noted Cárceres."

Share It With Others!

"Comcast has insisted the episode is the result of one rogue communications exec acting in haste and poor judgement. But it’s an apt illustration of the concern media justice advocates have voiced about telecom firms—that they have too much power and have proven themselves willing to abuse it. It’s also brought to the surface a host of perennially difficult questions for struggling community groups. How do you remain true to your politics while accepting (and seeking) funding from a corporation with politics that are at odds with yours? How do you bite the hand that feeds you?"

Share It With Others!

"'Just like the people of Wisconsin took a stand and said ‘enough is enough’, the youth of Tucson are standing up and letting it be known that they are fed up with these attacks on their education and on their future,' said Sal Baldenegro, Jr., a TUSD Ethnic Studies alum and member of the Southern Arizona Unity Coalition, AlterNet reported.

“'As Arizonans, we absolutely must stand behind our youth and say ‘enough is enough’ with these attacks on their education. There has never been a more critical time to stand behind our children as they fight for their rights and for their futures.'”

Share It With Others!

"Brett Solomon, the executive director of Access, said that the guide was created in part from recognition that people often lose sight of security concerns amid the collective euphoria that can accompany swift, large-scale democratization movements like the ones in Egypt and Tunisia. 'The eye gets focused on the goal and not the process,' he said, 'and during that time, they put their own personal security and their network security at risk.'"

Share It With Others!

"Black chose eight locations on the University of Winnipeg campus to display about 120 red dresses donated by people from many different cultures. The effect is simply stunning: Despite a very busy and noisy background of 9,000 students, they are so well positioned that they cannot be missed. The dresses just hang there, clothing with no bodies, creating an intense discomfort in the viewers. Visitors are left silent, unable to keep their eyes off the dresses, almost scared that moving around them could wake up some angry spirit.

"The color red also works perfectly here. Beyond its obvious meanings − blood, sexual energy and violence − there is also the blatant reminder that Canada remains a white-centered, male-dominated society that constantly tries to dehumanize Aboriginal women, and break their inner strength."

Share It With Others!

"Late last night I received an urgent appeal asking for help to prevent the deportation of Wilder Peña.

"Wilder Peña is currently detained in an immigration detention facility in Batavia, NY and scheduled for deportation to Colombia on February 28. His life was threatened following a massacre of ten persons and the assassination of three members of his family and several of his friends at the hands of illegal armed groups. Unfortunately, due to poor legal representation he was denied asylum. Two appeals, made by the same lawyer, were also denied. Pending deportation to a country where he could potentially be killed, Wilder fled to Canada, leaving his partner and their infant son behind. He was detained at the border and has been in detention ever since."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT