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Links 1 through 10 of 30 by Latoya Peterson tagged Africa

"Shea processing takes two routes. The raw nuts are sold to Asian oil companies in bulk who extract, refine and sell the oil to Europe for cosmetic purposes. Whereas unrefined shea butter is locally processed, certified organic, graded for purity then pushed onto the world market by upper level distributors. In both scenarios a hefty markup is added with none of the profits trickle down."

“'Poverty pimps, that’s all many NGOs really are,' stated Dr. Samuel Hunter of the American Shea Butter Institute. 'They claim that they are in the villages to help the people when in actuality their application of fair trade versus a living wage is often the biggest enabler of poverty for the women throughout this region.'”

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But could Goldberg have made his point without the slang? My money's on "yes."--AJP "This is psychologically fascinating: The mind of Fox Business host Eric Bolling, when confronted with images of President Obama meeting with Gabon's president, Ali Bongo, instantly recalls other black people who have met with President Obama, and comes to the conclusion that Obama feels deep love for black 'hoodlums.'"

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"Quentin D. Atkinson, a biologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, has shattered this time barrier, if his claim is correct, by looking not at words but at phonemes — the consonants, vowels and tones that are the simplest elements of language. Dr. Atkinson, an expert at applying mathematical methods to linguistics, has found a simple but striking pattern in some 500 languages spoken throughout the world: A language area uses fewer phonemes the farther that early humans had to travel from Africa to reach it."

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"Initially, I dismissed this as one of those things that academics worry about that the rest of the world really doesn't think about: Africans probably didn't make these films because they don't watch them. Considering that most African homes don't have televisions – I can't imagine that hearing a lion eating a wildebeest over the radio has quite the same effect as seeing it on television – surely the dearth of African presenters is a reflection of the lack of market for African fronted wildlife shows? However, if this is the case, what does that say about the people who do watch such shows? Will they only watch them when there's person of a certain demographic fronting them?"

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"A row has broken out over a 'fake' photograph of three black women police officers apparently asleep in the Mitchells Plain charge office – and the man believed to have taken the picture could face charges of crimen injuria and defamation.

"The Police and Prison Civil Rights Union (Popcru) claims the officers – a constable and two trainees – were told by an inspector to pose for the picture last week.

“'After he finished taking the picture, he laughed and told the three he would expose them in the media,' said Popcru provincial chairman Francisco Fields."

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"It is no accident that globalisation has seen the reemergence of slavery. The human degradation off West Africa is replicated elsewhere. I first came across modern slavery when investigating the UK chicken supply chain in Thailand in 2002. UK retailers and manufacturers now source much of their cheap commodity chicken from Asian factories. On the subcontracted farms around Bangkok that supply the international poultry processing factories I found illegal Burmese migrants trapped in debt bondage and forced labour. Fifteen Burmese refugees, interviewed for me by the American Centre for International Labour Solidarity, described sleeping in one room on the floor working whatever hours their Thai boss required of them, without pay and without a day off for two months. They had been kept in order by violence and by the threat of deportation if they complained."

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"CBC's coverage seems to give tacit approval to an idea of the big physical undisciplined African. Despite African teams averaging less than a goal against them in each one in their opening games, nearly all were challenged as having possible issues with a lack of defensive discipline. Going into the Nigeria vs. Argentina match, CBC's Nigel Reed claimed that Nigerians would be physical and challenge the Argentines. In actuality the Nigerians committed only one more foul than the South American team."

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"In the popular imagination, African music is the antithesis of urban. It's folk music, music of the bush, music of mythical village cultures that are still intact. Kwaito, born in townships and featuring occasionally misogynistic lyrics and a whiff of gangsterism, doesn't fit that image. Of course, the image is absolute nonsense: one of the first African sounds to make global inroads was jit, the sound of urban Zimbabwe in the 1980s. But you can see, even in its packaging, how this need to imagine Africa as exclusively rural persists: recently a reviewer rightly castigated the African Pearls compilation for an album cover that featured barefoot women dancing around a baobab tree — for a compilation of urban 1970s music from Senegal. It's quite a cheap trick."

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"Gift Trapence, executive director of the Centre for the Development of People, was at the court house Thursday and told reporters: 'How can they get 14 years simply for loving one another? Even if they are jailed for 20 years you can't change their sexuality.'''

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"Puma will launch Animagical, new fragrances for men and women, next month. The Animagical duo is fronted by Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt and was inspired by 'the magic of Africa'." 

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