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Links 1 through 10 of 444 Paul Bordoni's Bookmarks

A Gender-Responsive Agricultural Development Program to guide Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grantmaking and grantees

Know Her
Understand the context and situation of women farmers in the proposed intervention. Investigate their needs, constraints, responsibilities, and priorities. Anticipate how the grant will impact women’s labor, time, and current practices and resources.

Design for Her
Develop a project that is intentionally designed to reach and benefit women as well as men. Create goals and milestones that account for women's participation. Establish a program culture of recognizing and supporting women’s roles from the very start.

Be Accountable to Her
Strive to meet objectives that include women’s active involvement in the program. Continually evaluate progress in relation to women's successes as well as household successes. Collect feedback, measure results, and iterate program design to ensure women are participating and benefitting from the program’s resources

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Being able to access, control, and own productive assets such as land, labor, finance, and social capital enables people to create stable and productive lives. Yet relatively little is known about how agricultural development programs can most effectively deliver these outcomes of well-being, empowerment, and higher income in a way that acknowledges differential access to and control over assets by men and women. ...

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This unique collection of in-depth case studies from Latin America, Asia, Africa, Europe and North America demonstrates the importance of women and gender relations in plant genetic resource management and conservation. It provides a state-of-the-art overview of the concepts, relationships and contexts explaining the relatively hidden gender dimensions of people-plant relations. The contributors come from a rich range of disciplines including ethnobotany, geography, agronomy, anthropology, plant breeding, nutrition and development economics. They demonstrate how crucial women are to plant biodiversity management and conservation at household, village, and community levels; and how gender relations have a strong influence on the ways in which local people understand, manage, and conserve biodiversity.

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The key role played by women in agriculture was in the past largely unacknowledged in government statistics and decision-making. This situation has changed over the last two or three decades, and much has been achieved in giving recognition to the importance of women in the agricultural sector. The empowerment of women engaged in farming is gathering pace in many parts of the developing world. However, these recent advances may be under threat from such factors as structural adjustment
programmes (SAPs), the drive to commercialize agriculture and the retreat of government from rural development in many countries. These factors have eroded gains and threaten to create a situation where women’s role reverts to being unrecognized and where gender-blind policies and programmes fail to address the
needs of women farmers.

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This page addresses gender segregation and labour force efficiency, women in the agricultural labour force, and the social dimension.

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Women play a vital role as agricultural producers and as agents of food and nutritional security. Yet relative to men, they have less access to productive assets such as land and services such as finance and extension. A variety of constraints impinge upon their ability to participate in collective action as members of agricultural cooperative or water user associations. In both centralized and decentralized governance systems, women tend to lack political voice.

Gender inequalities result in less food being grown, less income being earned, and higher levels of poverty and food insecurity. Agriculture in low-income developing countries is a sector with exceptionally high impact in terms of its potential to reduce poverty. Yet for agricultural growth to fulfill this potential, gender disparities must be addressed and effectively reduced.

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This edition of The State of Food and Agriculture addresses Women in agriculture: closing the gender gap for development. The agriculture sector is underperforming in many developing countries, and one of the key reasons is that women do not have equal access to the resources and opportunities they need to be more productive.

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Selected concepts central to Gender and Development thinking are explained here. These are intended to help explore some of the key ideas and issues in Gender and Development and their implications for policy and practice. The succinct explanations here are neither comprehensive nor definitive. Readers are advised to consult the recommended readings for more detailed discussions.

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This study on Bangladesh was undertaken to analyze the gender dimensions of climate change and the role of institutions in reducing gender gaps. The study was carried out in 20 sites covering 600 households, from March 2010 to May 2011, using both qualitative and quantitative instruments. This note is organized into five sections. The next section gives an overview of climate change and the gender and institutional context in Bangladesh. The third section presents the key study findings and is divided into three subsections: site- and household-specific vulnerabilities; analysis of gender dimensions of climate change using the household data and four propositions; and description of institutional challenges and gaps in supporting the resilience of women and men. Section four provides examples of adaptation programs in Bangladesh, and section five provides recommendations for enhancing gender-responsive adaptive capacity in Bangladesh

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This pilot research documented some of the gender-differentiated climate change impacts and adaptation interventions. It also examined scientific evidence and women’s perceptions on how key climate parameters like rainfall, temperature and wind patterns are changing and how this is affecting their agriculture-related livelihoods. The research suggests specific gender-responsive policy and practice recommendations for the implementation of the four adaptation-focused National Missions.

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