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Links 1 through 10 of 15 by Chad Orzel tagged new-york

The Parent-Teacher Association’s decision to raise the price of a cupcake at its monthly bake sale — to $1, from 50 cents — was supposed to be a simple way to raise extra money in the face of city budget cuts.

Instead, in a neighborhood whose median household income leaped to $60,184 in 2010 from $34,878 a decade before, the change generated unexpected ire, pitting cash-short parents against volunteer bakers, and dividing a flummoxed PTA executive board, where wealthier newcomers to the school serve alongside poorer immigrants who have called the area home for years.

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THIRTY THOUSAND FEET ABOVE AMERICA — To all of you down there, to the flyover country I’m currently flying over?

Sorry.

To the fine sporting folk of Northern California, to all of your West Coast brethren, to those of you down South and up North and everywhere else south of South Amboy, N.J., and north of Northampton, Mass., and west of Eastchester, N.Y.?

Yeah. Sorry to all of you, too. Because these next 12 days? They belong to us again, to New York and New England, to Gotham and Olde Towne, to New York and New Jersey, to Massachusetts and Maine, to that great DMZ of Connecticut that finds itself betwixt and between.

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"Now, it’s true, the storm did not particularly batter New York City. And I think anyone with an ounce of compassion and decency would view that as an overwhelmingly good thing. A major hurricane battering the largest city in America would be a bad thing.

But declaring immediately as Irene passed that it had done no damage, that it had been of no consequence, seemed rather haughty. After all, Irene had not merely struck New York City. It affected states as far south as North Carolina, and as far north as the Canadian border (not to mention Canada itself). And declaring this while rain was still falling on New York City seemed especially egregious; as those of us whose memories stretched back five years and 364 days could remember, the worst damage to come from a hurricane doesn’t always present itself immediately."

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"The group tested 68 drinking water wells in the Marcellus and Utica shale drilling areas in northeastern Pennsylvania and southern New York State. Sixty of those wells were tested for dissolved gas. While most of the wells had some methane, the water samples taken closest to the gas wells had on average 17 times the levels detected in wells further from active drilling. The group defined an active drilling area as within one kilometer, or about six tenths of a mile, from a gas well.

The average concentration of the methane detected in the water wells near drilling sites fell squarely within a range that the U.S Department of Interior says is dangerous and requires urgent “hazard mitigation” action, according to the study."

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"Syosset is nearly 3 1/2 times wealthier than West Genesee. It spent $25,990 per pupil in 2008-09, compared to West Genesee’s $13,854.

And that disparity is likely to grow under Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s proposed budget.

The governor’s school aid cuts would equal 0.77 percent of Syosset’s general fund budget. But they would blow a 6.8 percent hole in West Genesee’s general fund. Superintendent Christopher Brown told his school board recently that the district would have to cut 62 full- and part-time positions, drop a year of middle school art and eliminate its seventh-grade reading program and high school Latin classes, among many other reductions. That’s while increasing the tax levy by 4.8 percent and freezing employee salaries."

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"New York Gov. David A. Paterson on Saturday vetoed legislation intended to curtail natural gas development using the technique called hydraulic fracturing until a closer review of its effects can be undertaken.

Instead, the governor issued an executive order instituting a moratorium that extends until July 1, 2011 — beyond the date specified in the legislation — and that more narrowly defines the types of drilling to be restricted."

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"This amazing scene was captured by Arthur Lovell of Oxford, UK, around 2pm on November 4, 2010, when a large section of overhanging sandstone rock from the cathedral-like gorge wall fell into the plunge-pool below, creating a massive wave. The rock is estimated at 54 ft (16.5 m) across, and the void it left can be seen in the before and after photos to the left. Taughannock Falls itself is 215 ft (65.5 m) and the surrounding gorge walls extend over 100 ft higher."

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My uncle's tv ad for his NY State Senate campaign.

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"Newcomers are often insecure, and a debt of gratitude can make anyone feel a bit awkward, so I try my best to be patient with some of the sillier things often said by those from the American "heartland" about supposed "East Coast elites" in general and New York in particular.

But that patience has its limits and I may have reached those limits listening to various non-New Yorkers bloviating about where and how New Yorkers ought to be allowed to worship. (I'm from the heartland of New Jersey, myself, where I was taught that real Americans don't imagine it's their business to tell someone where they can or cannot worship.)

So before I endure yet another silly speech about how the real-er real Americans from the real-er real America are so superior to the illegitimate pseudo-Americans of New York, I would ask that the speaker first respond to the following questions."

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"On Tuesday morning, workers excavating the site of the underground vehicle security center for the future World Trade Center hit a row of sturdy, upright wood timbers, regularly spaced, sticking out of a briny gray muck flecked with oyster shells.

Obviously, these were more than just remnants of the wooden cribbing used in the late 18th and early 19th centuries to extend the shoreline of Manhattan Island ever farther into the Hudson River. (Lower Manhattan real estate was a precious commodity even then.)

“They were so perfectly contoured that they were clearly part of a ship,” said A. Michael Pappalardo, an archaeologist with the firm AKRF, which is working for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to document historical material uncovered during construction."

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