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Links 1 through 10 of 185 by Chad Orzel tagged music

AVC: You come from a punk background. That seems to fit in with the anti-nationalism, anti-corporate, and anti-religious messages of “Imagine,” no?
FT: Yes, but that’s one of the things that’s so fucking annoying about it. Compared to, say, “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” or indeed anything by Crass or The Clash or Propagandhi, it’s so utterly vacuous. It’s a Hallmark card set to music. There’s a pretty high dose of hypocrisy in here as well. For a man who had a dedicated, refrigerated room in his New York penthouse apartment for storing his fur-coat collection to sing “Imagine no possessions” takes a fair amount of chutzpah. I mean, I have no problem with the man collecting fur coats. Whatever floats your boat. But there’s a certain strain of material disdain that can only result from being really fucking rich, which is intensely patronizing.

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[N]o chart-related phrase seems to have struck the general public's fancy like "one-hit wonder." It's catchy—not unlike the songs it denotes—and it's adaptable. We've seen it applied to politics and business.

But when "one-hit wonder" is meant to describe, y'know, music, it gets a little too adaptable. Sure, there are undeniable, undisputed OHWs like Los Del Rio, the suited, middle-aged Spaniards behind "Macarena" who dominated the Hot 100 in 1996 and never graced an American chart again after 1997. But the term has also been used to describe a slew of acts who generated at least a pair of hits—or more.

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If you, like me, are a little bit behind Internet fads and belatedly wondering what the heck that "Gangnam Style" video is about, here's the first part of a comprehensive explanation.

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[T]he legacy of the most explosive Whigs records — Congregation and Gentlemen in particular — is practically written in blood. Lyrics detail emotional warfare, crumbling relationships, infidelity, sexual humiliation, and a never-ending stream of lies. But even the worst lines come from a place of vulnerability: Dulli needs to hurt because he hurts. Listening is a harrowing, addictive experience.

Now that the Afghan Whigs have officially reformed and begun releasing new material (check out last month’s simmering rendition of Marie Lyons’ “See And Don’t See,” the time is ripe to revisit the band at their characteristic best, which means digging into their emotional worst. Here are 13 of the most vicious Afghan Whigs songs, spanning their entire career — strap yourself in for a hell of a ride.

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A comprehensive guide to the most important musician of the last 50-ish years.

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The bassist usually doesn't get much attention. Occasionally, a flashy player hogs the spotlight with slapping, popping, and soloing, but it's usually just a quiet guy holding down the low end and staying out of the way. For many listeners, Duck Dunn probably seemed like the latter sort of rudimentary player. That's probably the way he would have had it, too. But it would be a mistake to think of Dunn, who died in his sleep at 70 Sunday, as a background player. In fact, he is probably the most influential bassist of the last 50 years, with an impact in every pop genre save country.

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The moment you tell people you're seeing Creed and Nickelback in concert — on the same night, at roughly the same time, in two different venues — it suddenly becomes a stunt. Just describing the premise seems schlocky; it's like Def Leppard playing on three different continents in 24 hours, or maybe something David Blaine would attempt if he worked for the Fuse network. The immediate assumption is that this is some type of sonic endurance test, and that no person could possibly enjoy the experience of seeing the most hated (yet popular) rock band of 2001 followed by the most popular (yet hated) rock band of 2012. But this is what I wanted to do: I wanted to see Creed at New York's intimate Beacon Theatre (performing their 1997 album My Own Prison in its entirety), followed by Nickelback in front of 18,000 people at Madison Square Garden.

Last Thursday, this dream was accomplished.

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Articles last month revealed that musician Neil Young and Apple's Steve Jobs discussed offering digital music downloads of 'uncompromised studio quality'. Much of the press and user commentary was particularly enthusiastic about the prospect of uncompressed 24 bit 192kHz downloads. 24/192 featured prominently in my own conversations with Mr. Young's group several months ago.

Unfortunately, there is no point to distributing music in 24-bit/192kHz format. Its playback fidelity is slightly inferior to 16/44.1 or 16/48, and it takes up 6 times the space.

There are a few real problems with the audio quality and 'experience' of digitally distributed music today. 24/192 solves none of them. While everyone fixates on 24/192 as a magic bullet, we're not going to see any actual improvement.

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Now available on YouTube: the video for Whisperado’s “Teenage Popstar Girl.” Song written by Sobel / Nielsen Hayden / Mills. Video concept and direction by Dan Azarian. Whisperado does not normally perform in black suits and ties. Contents may settle during shipping. Contains nuts.

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I subscribe to the theory that every band or artist, no matter how terrible, has at least one genuinely good song in them. Blink-182 has “I Miss You,” Peter Frampton has “Baby I Love Your Way,” Ice Cube has “It Was A Good Day.” What are your favorite good songs by terrible bands?

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