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Links 1 through 10 of 27 by Nik Silver tagged trends

"Since the last publication of the Technology Radar, these technology trends are most prominent: Continued development of alternatives to SQL datastores; Treating all code from UI to tests with respect; Increasing diversification and rigor in browser based languages and technologies; Smaller, simpler and faster applications and services"

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If you had to pick 10 technology-related trends that will impact your enterprise infrastructure in the coming year, Gartner says you'd do well to start with virtualization and move to other issues such as social media influence, energy issues and flat networks to name a few.

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"Both Gartner and IDC said that PC makers now face serious competition from the tablet market, but noted that other factors could be at play: "While it's tempting to blame the decline completely on the growth of media tablets, we believe other factors, including extended PC lifetimes and the lack of compelling new PC experiences, played equally significant roles," said Bob O'Donnell, program vice-president at IDC."

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"The course of social media never did run smooth — not for long, anyhow. And for some Web 2.0 companies, it’s running less smoothly than ever." Hmm... bit of a painful infographic, more an article with pictures rendered as an image. But thought-provoking charts -- why does the network effect sometimes fail?

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"Early last year, "checking in" was the cool new craze. No visit to your favorite tech news site could be had without getting buried in an avalanche of articles about Foursquare, Gowalla, Loopt, BriteKite or a myriad other startups. The big guys quickly followed suit: Yelp introduced "Check-Ins" while Facebook launched "Places" and most recently, Google Latitude updated to incorporate check-ins and check-outs. But here's the thing: the trends aren't actually that good."

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"There are few things journalists like to discuss more than, well, themselves and the long-term prospects for their industry. How long will print newspapers survive? Are news aggregation sites the future? Or are online paywalls — such as the one the New York Times just launched — the way to go? As media organizations plot their future, it’s worth discarding some misconceptions about what it will take to keep the press from becoming yesterday’s news."

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"When it comes to public-facing web analytics, basically, they all suck. We in the press are sometimes forced to use tools like Alexa and Compete for comparison’s sake, but using either for absolute numbers is extremely flawed and basically worthless. Naturally, those companies always disagree with us when we say such things. But a new bit of information may put that disagreement to the test. The Compete chart for Compete.com is perfect. If the chart is to be believed, Compete is in a total tailspin. According to their data, they’ve dropped from about 750K unique visitors in January 2010 to roughly 250K in December 2010."

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Probably not, but we're certainly developing a lot of similar bad habits.

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"...Which is why we're delighted be able to bring you Nic's 2011 journalism and technology predictions: a 19-page look at what lies ahead in the next 12 months, tackling everything from tablet computing to social media and beyond." Registration required.

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"So can we say that RSS is dead? Sure — in the same way that HTML is dead, or the web itself is dead (if the “death of RSS” idea seems familiar, that’s because it has reared its head several times before). There used to be plenty of HTML editors out there, which allowed people to create their own websites and web pages, but they never really went mainstream either, and HTML has evolved to the point where it’s a specialty that requires actual programming skills in order to be effective. Is that bad thing? Not if you make a living as a web designer. Hypertext markup language has become part of the plumbing of the web, and now allows far more utility than it used to."

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