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Links 1 through 10 of 3124 nananaina's Bookmarks

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“just getting started trying to figure out what it means to curate on the internet.”

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Deliver WOW Through Service Embrace and Drive Change Create Fun and A Little Weirdness Be Adventurous, Creative, and Open-Minded Pursue Growth and Learning Build Open and Honest Relationships With Communication Build a Positive Team and Family Spirit Do More With Less Be Passionate and Determined Be Humble

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Is it better for mobile apps to be easy-to-use, or secure? It’s a question that app developers constantly grapple with in the face of a competitive landscape, and it can sometimes take a data breach like Snapchat’s to push them in the latter direction.  Earlier this week security researcher Daniel Wood disclosed his findings on how Starbucks SBUX -5.64% was storing data about users of its iOS app in plain text and locally on a device, making passwords and even geolocation data about users vulnerable to theft if the wrong kind of hacker got hold of their iPhone. Starbucks has said it knows about the app’s vulnerability and that the possibility of it being exploited is “very far fetched.” It says that none of the app’s 10 million users have come forward to claim their data has been misused as a result.

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What was so compelling about the Starbucks value proposition? The value proposition of Starbucks focused on a brand strategy that was comprised of three components. The brand strategy was best captured by the phrase “live coffee.” This phrase reflected the importance of keeping the national coffee culture alive. From a retail perspective, this meant creating an “experience” that people would want to incorporate into their everyday lives. There were also three components to the branding strategy. The first component was simply the coffee. Starbucks offered the highest-quality coffee in the world and controlled much of the supply chain as possible to help insure that. Starbucks worked directly with growers to purchase green coffee beans, it oversaw the custom-roasting process, and it controlled distribution to retail stores around the world. The second brand component was service, or what was also referred to as “customer intimacy.” This included simple things such as remembering someone’s name or drink order. The third brand component was atmosphere. Starbucks stated that people came for the coffee but stayed for the atmosphere. Therefore it was important to provide a comfortable atmosphere that allowed a sense of community. All of these things combined led to a compelling value proposition.

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