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Links 1 through 10 of 85 by Maria Niles tagged music

Backing Bruce Springsteen on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon Tuesday night was a near-surreal experience for The Roots drummer ?uestlove. "During rehearsal, when the producer said, 'Ladies and gentleman, 'Because The Night' with the Professor and Little Steven, here's Bruce Springsteen and The Roots' — I couldn't move," ?uestlove tells Rolling Stone. "And they were looking at me like, 'Okay count the song off.' And I was like, I said, 'Holy shit. I heard that.'"

He adds: "I mean, I've done some intense playing on our show, but that was the most intense playing I've ever done. He completely surpassed any expectation I've ever had for any mythical god of rock figure."

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“The Sea” is a testament to the idea that love transforms you, not just your emotions, but your entire sense of identity. She acknowledged that her husband had played a big role in her evolution from a young rocker girl to a more soulful singer. As a teenager her first interest was grunge. “I loved that P J Harvey and Courtney Love had this sexuality that had nothing to do with the male gaze, it was ‘This is how I want to look.’ It made me feel like there was something defiant about being a black girl with short hair and an electric guitar.” From the age of 15 she played in a mostly female rock band called Helen.

When she was 19, Ms. Rae was working as a coat-check girl in a jazz club where she occasionally sang soul standards. One night she caught Mr. Rae, a saxophonist, supporting Maceo Parker. “They played ‘Georgia on My Mind,’ which I’d never heard before, and I burst into tears,” she recalled with a sad smile. “I knew that, from that point on, my life was going to change.”

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But the flip side of disintermediation — not having to rely on any middleman for approval or distribution — is a near-infinite slush pile. All the filtering that used to take place out of earshot, in A&R and club bookers’ offices, can be bypassed.

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However, Chesnutt had recently struggled with a lawsuit filed by a Georgia hospital after he racked up surgery bills totaling some $70,000, the Athens newspaper reported. He said he couldn't afford more than hospitalization insurance and couldn't keep up with the payments.

The problems baffled his Canadian bandmates, Chesnutt said.

"There's nowhere else in the world that I'd be facing the situation I'm in right now. They cannot understand what kind of society would inflict that on their population," he said. "It's terrifying."

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“It is absolutely easy to say vinyl doesn’t make sense when you look at convenience, portability, all those things,” Mr. Jbara said. “But all the really great stuff in our lives comes from a root of passion or love.”

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A Nov. 26 article in the District edition of Local Living incorrectly said a Public Enemy song declared 9/11 a joke. The song refers to 911, the emergency phone number.

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And by the way, I do not align myself with those that say the Internet is killing music. On the contrary, I argue that the major record labels and the RIAA, through their relentless lawsuits campaign, destroyed the trust and goodwill that music fans felt when interacting with music brands [musicians, artists, bands,] and by doing that they pushed music into being a good, a mere commodity. We need new thinking…. So I have to ask – why is there no online music equivalent of punk rock? Why is there no real and passionate embrace of the new?

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I’m not claiming my second education has been exemplary or advanced. I’m describing it because I have only become aware of it retrospectively, and society pays too much attention to the first education and not enough to the second.

In fact, we all gather our own emotional faculty — artists, friends, family and teams. Each refines and develops the inner instrument with a million strings.

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Book publishing is a "hits" business, with a tiny fraction of huge sellers--thank you Dan Brown, Malcolm Gladwell, and soon, Sarah Palin--carrying the rest of us losers. Publishers don't care about dropping money on 99 books if the 100th is a Tipping Point or Freakonomics. This also characterizes the music business and we can see how well that turned out, but I digress.

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Still, the most fascinating part of the book is its retelling of how the big music companies committed capitalist suicide. The executives couldn’t get their analog heads around the digital future. If industry leaders had always followed their mistrust of technology, we’d still be listening to music on 78-r.p.m. shellac, or maybe even wax cylinders.

“Ripped” is another case study in American industrial arrogance, an account of companies that couldn’t (or wouldn’t) learn agility. Instead of adapting to the new reality, they started calling their customers thieves.

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