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Links 1 through 10 of 128 by Maria Niles tagged gender

In her essay “Woman-Hating Right and Left”, Andrea Dworkin says, “Part of having a feminist resistance to male power includes expanding the base of that resistance to other women, to women you have less in common with, to women you have nothing in common with. It means active, proselytizing dialogue with women of many different political viewpoints because their lives are worth what your lives are worth.” My feminist ideals include women, period. All women. Even the women who don’t know or care that I’m fighting for rights on their behalf. Even the Real Housewives of Orange County. And yes, even privileged white American women.

Because their lives are worth what my life is worth.

You don’t have to be a feminist. But I AM a feminist.

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Do I know professional black women who would like to be married moms? Of course I do. I also know black women with low savings account balances and high blood pressure. But these women aren't defined by their marriage and mommy status, their 401Ks or their latest blood work-ups. Humans are more complex than that. But race and gender biases tend to create flattened versions of people. And a steady stream of negativity about black women, absent the balance of positive news, distorts reality.

It's harder to maintain prejudices against a person if you "know" them. So, perhaps black women should be happy that the American media is finally noticing us. We have long lamented being invisible. Problem is, you cannot truly know us if you don't see us — all of us — our triumphs and successes, as well as our challenges.

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I am excited about #Happyblackgirl day because it is about us affirming ourselves and not looking to mainstream media to do so.

I am grateful that @Sistatoldja took the time to make it happen. The 7th day of every month is now, Happy Black Girl Day. Wooter.

Last week I tweeted “Black women are awesome on 55 million different levels. CNN can’t capture that and I don’t expect them to. It ain’t they job, its ours.“

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We do not control our media and cultural systems or the institutions of civil society, and therefore the narrative of black female citizenship has been used in so many ways as the lynchpin to justify the most brutal democracy in the world. The lies that our citizenship is somehow a gift and not a right, that our mothers are responsible for the socialization of black children and therefore the cause of their incarceration, and that our daughters have drained and massacred the economy, have justified mass incarceration, war, the privatization of social services and health care, and the defunding of public education. The same has been done to black men, using different stereotypes. But this, right here, is about black women.

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So advertisers penalize More for its age: The average More reader makes about $93,000, around $30,000 more than the average for Vogue, Allure or Harper’s Bazaar, according to Mediamark Research and Intelligence. But More has hardly a luxury ad in it.

And they penalize the magazine because its readers are female. The More reader makes a lot more than the average reader of Esquire, at about $66,800, and GQ, at about $75,100. But where GQ, Esquire, and the younger women’s magazines are filled with ads for designer clothes, fragrances and expensive accessories, the ads in More suggest that when rich women hit 40, they yearn for cheap processed foods.

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I love Black women—personally, professionally and politically. I realize that this surprises many people. Some wonder if I am simply fetishizing Black women as sassy, “keepin’ it real” sistas, sort of a 21st century Sapphire. Unfortunately, many gay men—white men particularly—love to conjure this stereotype when meeting Black women. Personally, Black women have played a critical role in my life. I have known too many Black women to ever pigeon-hole them. I know too well that Black women are as diverse than any other group. No, my love comes from a keen understanding of the role Black women have played in my life and in American history.

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In last year’s presidential election, younger blacks voted in greater proportions than whites for the first time and black women turned out at a higher rate than any other racial, ethnic and gender group, a census analysis released Monday confirmed.

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Q: Now that Judge Sotomayor has been nominated, how do you feel about that?

JUSTICE GINSBURG: I feel great that I don’t have to be the lone woman around this place.

Q: What has that been like?

JUSTICE GINSBURG: It’s almost like being back in law school in 1956, when there were 9 of us in a class of over 500, so that meant most sections had just 2 women, and you felt that every eye was on you. Every time you went to answer a question, you were answering for your entire sex. It may not have been true, but certainly you felt that way. You were different and the object of curiosity.

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Pretending that professional black women are marauding about, breaking black men's hearts over poorly-moisturized feet and cold-weather beverages makes a humorous story, but also reinforces the meme that hard-hearted, over-educated, status-obsessed black women are to blame for the sorry state of black marriage. If only we weren't so demanding.

Most women I know aren't holding out for six-figure bank accounts, multiple degrees and crazy "swagga." They do want a man with similar values and interests and life goals who treats them well and makes them tingle in all the right places.

Since when is that too much to ask?

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The more feminist literature I read, the more it strikes me that the reason so many men are hostile towards the idea of gender equality is because it would dramatically alter their role and status in society.

Men - particularly Western, white, straight males like me - pretty much won the genetic lottery when they were born because they immediately entered the top tier of a society constructed around the notion of their primacy and privilege. Who'd wanna give that up? ...

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