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Links 1 through 10 of 29 by Morbus Iff tagged games

"These are games where the rules are intentionally concealed from new players, either because their discovery is part of the game itself, or because the game is a hoax and the rules do not exist. In fiction, the counterpart of the first category are games that supposedly do have a rule set, but that rule set is not disclosed." Includes discovery games, hoax or joke games, and games in works of fiction.

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"In thirty-eight years, The Price is Right never had a contestant guess the exact value of prizes in the Showcase showdown. Until Terry Kniess outsmarted everyone — and changed everything … He looked into the audience for a moment, leaned into his microphone, and said his bid as though he were reading it from a slip of paper: $23,743. … "Wow," Drew Carey said. "That's a very exact bid. We'll be right back, folks," Carey said. "Don't go away." And then the show just stopped."

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"The goal for marketing types in the Internet age is a "viral" ad campaign. You pull off some publicity stunt, there's tons of coverage on the internet, you wind up with millions of eyeballs for virtually no cost. But viral campaigns are all about pushing the envelope. You have to shock people to get their attention, and this is where the potential for disaster lies. Awful, hilarious disaster."

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"I periodically post about “games and names,” or etymologies and explanations of names and words that appear in video games. Over time, I’ve come across various bits of information that I didn’t feel deserved their own post but that might be interesting to readers. I began collecting these bits in what was at one point a short list of odds and ends but which now exists as a bigger-than-planned list of name etymologies, translation oddities, and my own geek theories — with footnotes, no less." Includes the Legend of Zelda, Mario, Donkey Kong, Wario, Sonic the Hedgehog, Street Fighter and other Capcon titles, Final Fantasy, Metroid, Kid Icarus, Castlevania, Earthbound, Chrono Trigger, Secret of Mana, Mega Man, and more.

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"Humans have a tendency to anthropomorphize AI opponents. We think the computer is going through a thought process just like a human would do in a similar situation. When we see the ball end up in an advantageous position, we think the computer must have intended that to happen. The effect is magnified here by the computer's ability to pot a ball from any position, so for the computer, all positions are equally advantageous. Hence, it can pot ball after ball, without having to worry about positional play. Because sinking a ball on every single shot would be impossible for a human, the player assumes that the computer is using positional play."

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"In this article, I will be taking a closer look at the various types of adventure game puzzles, how they relate to the gameplay, and even how some of these basic forms relate to other game genres." Creates a classification of self-contained puzzles (interaction, mini-game, and riddle puzzles) and key puzzles (inventory, pattern, and implicit information puzzles).

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"For collectible card games (CCGs), game designers often limit the availability of cards that have a particularly powerful gameplay effect. The conventional wisdom is that the more powerful a card is, the more rare it should be. The long-term implications of such an approach can have negative consequences on a game’s suitability for casual play. Digital Addiction (a company that produced online, collectible card games in the 1990s) developed a different game design philosophy for balancing collectible card games. The approach called for the most obviously and generally useful cards to be the most common and to equate rarity to specialization rather than raw power."

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"So here's the big question: Are some games intentionally designed to keep you compulsively playing, even when you're not enjoying it? #5: Putting You in a Skinner Box; #4: Creating Virtual Food Pellets For You To Eat; #3: Making You Press the Lever; #2: Keeping You Pressing It… Forever; #1: Getting You To Call the Skinner Box Home."

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"As someone who adamantly prefers to call themselves a "game critic" rather than a "game reviewer," I've been asked by several parties to make some counter-comment to film critic Roger Ebert's recent post. Presumably they were all hoping for some expletive-laden takedown of all Ebert's arguments broken up by comparisons between the man and various historical dictators and farm animals. But the thing is, I like Ebert. I think he's an intelligent guy and well worth listening to, especially when he's got a particularly terrible film in his sights. In my more egotistical moments, I might one day aspire to being his videogaming equivalent."

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