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Links 1 through 10 of 8609 Martin Stabe's Bookmarks

"Each day, the New York Police Department announces major crimes, including most homicides, in the five boroughs. This data is compiled from those reports, in addition to news accounts, court records and additional reporting. The map will be updated as new information becomes available."

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Great video animation based graphic looking at the performance all Olympian medalists in various events since 1896.

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Is it "data is" or "data are"? Views from WSJ, Economist, NY Times and Guardian.

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Megan Garber: "[In] a fascinating paper [pdf] from UCLA and Hewlett-Packard's HP Labs ... researchers Roja Bandari, Sitram Asur, and Bernardo Huberman teamed up to try to predict the popularity -- which is to say, the spreadability -- of news articles in the social space. While previous work has relied on articles' early performance to predict their popularity over their remaining lifespan, Bandari et al focused on predicting their popularity even before they're formulated in the first place. The researchers have developed a tool that allows people -- and, in particular, news organizations -- to calibrate their content in advance of their posting and tweeting, creating stuff that's optimized for maximum attention and impact. That tool allows for the forecasting of an article's popularity with a remarkable 84 percent accuracy -- and it has implications not just for articles, but for tweets themselves."

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Neil Thackray: "As far as I can tell from the data available on the PPC site, there has been only ever been one complaint about a business to business title. ... [The] B2B media industry is subsidising the investigation of complaints into other media whilst its own probity in matters journalistic is substantially beyond reproach. I have no interest in subsidising the policing of phone hacking journalists, or door stepping reporters anymore than would the directors of Tesco."

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Good case study on FoI, open data and the how cleaning data is always the first, and often most valuable, step in the data journalism process: "Following the launch of the OpenData website ... we downloaded the MoT data when it became available and set about getting it into a format that could be easily accessed. With more than 355m records, 200m MoTs (all those since the system was computerised in 2006) and 40gb of data, this wasn't an easy task. Like the BBC, we have also had a few problems dealing with the MoT data that's provided by the Government. Firstly, it's huge and difficult to work with. Secondly, as it's sourced from thousands of technicians - and humans make mistakes - it was littered with errors. There were plenty of cars registered in the 1800s and a few steam-powered Renault Clios to boot. We've done our best to ensure it's as clean as possible, but with such a huge data set, there may still be the odd error."

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"Motoring website Honest John goes live today with a huge data journalism project based on analysis of 24.5m MoT tests conducted up to 30 September 2011. ... The MoT information was released by the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) after a Freedom of Information battle fought by the BBC."

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Profile of Joe Weisenthal of Business Insider: "During the course of an average 16-hour day, Weisenthal writes 15 posts, ranging from charts with a few lines of explanatory text to several hundred words of closely reasoned analysis. He manages nearly a dozen reporters, demanding and redirecting story ideas. He fiddles incessantly with the look and contents of the site. And all the while he holds a running conversation with the roughly 19,000 people who follow his Twitter alter ego, the Stalwart. ... He is like the host of a daylong radio show, except no one speaks out loud. He rarely makes phone calls. His phone almost never rings."

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Tony Hirst visualises the network of legal companies that comprise Tesco's corporate structure using OpenCorporates, Scraperwiki and Gephi to map their interlocking directorships.

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David Higgerson sums it up very nicely: "the difference between [Freedom of Information] and open data is that the former allows the public to set the agenda for what should be released, the latter doesn’t."

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