Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 55 by Just Mohit tagged workplace

If your boss is seen as a librarian, she becomes a resource, not a limit. If you view the people you work with as coaches, and your job as a platform, it can transform what you do each day, starting right now. "My boss won't let me," doesn't deserve to be in your vocabulary. Instead, it can become, "I don't want to do that because it's not worth the time/resources." (Or better, it can become, "go!")
The opportunity of our age is to get out of this boss as teacher as taskmaster as limiter mindset. We need more from you than that.

Share It With Others!

we attribute other people’s behavior to psychology and our own behavior to context...
They’re not different kinds of people than we were when we were their age. Human nature hasn’t changed. But behavior is motivation filtered through opportunity. One of the questions to ask yourself as a manager is, are they responding to opportunities that were different than opportunities I had and constraints that were different than constraints I had...
If the search costs for finding a new job are easier outside your company than inside your company, you’re communicating something to them about loyalty as well...
But it’s culturally very hard, because it accepts the fact that the employees who are on your front line, who may well be your best next employees in higher positions, have a much greater ability to search for opportunity than they used to. And so you can’t rely on them sticking around for however long you want them to stick around before you promote them

Share It With Others!

Ask yourself: "Do I enjoy helping my team and my team members succeed?"
If the answer is "no," you're probably a bad boss and you may want to find something else to do. Helping the team and the team members succeed is what your job is all about and if you don't enjoy it, the odds go way up that you do a lousy job.
Helping the team succeed means concentrating on the important things, keeping everyone focused on the key job and making sure the work gets done. Helping team members succeed means spending a large chunk of your day helping them grow and develop and giving them the freedom to learn from the inevitable mistakes.

Share It With Others!

Those who follow the market are familiar with the earnings game: deliver an unexpected stellar quarter, and a stock can gain hundreds of millions, if not billions, of market value. But match, or barely beat expectations, and the market yawns, or worse, dumps the stock...
Those of us who are in the market understand and play by these rules. But how many of us are guilty of falling into the same "what have you done for me lately?" mentality with our employees? When what our colleagues and employees do every day becomes no more than a benchmark to beat, it can seem unimpressive. We may start to undervalue what makes our organization really hum. Yet if they stopped doing what they always do, our business would surely unravel...
Maybe some bosses worry that praising people for the stuff they do every day will disincentivize them from going the extra mile. But in fact, gratitude can be a vital tie that binds in a workplace.

Share It With Others!

To your staff, the gift of listening, asking, and inclusion
To your manager, the gift of your commitment and follow through to getting the job done
To your peers, the gift of support and solidarity
To your customers, the gift of high touch, high quality products and services
To those who disagree, the gift of understanding their point of view
To those who don’t speak up, the gift of asking them to share their thoughts
To those who fear for their jobs, the gift of honesty or reassurance (whichever makes sense)
To your superstars, the gift of challenging work
To those who struggle with their work, the gift of helping them to find a better fit
To your family and friends, the gift of your time and your heart
To everyone you come in contact with, the gift of letting them know that they matter.

Share It With Others!

This manifesto is about how to work with such an adversarial character, whether they are your boss, peer or team member. It is about how to use the specific behavior you need to use to help you manage the unclear boundaries, ambivalent motives and occasional duplicitous conduct that characterizes adversarial working relationships.

Share It With Others!

In order for a corporate organism to survive, it needs managers to help it function and grow. And it needs those managers to place company priorities over personal priorities whenever necessary, to marginalize their own values and beliefs in favor of company goals and methods.
To ensure this happens, companies bribe, bluff and bully their managers. In return, companies get financial, intellectual and physical commitment. But they don't get emotional commitment, which is what they really need to ensure ultimate survival.
Companies can't get emotional commitment from their managers because the company believes it needs to be the dominant organism in the relationship, which causes managers to have to repress their own values—and so causes them to detach emotionally from their jobs. Inorder to really get that emotional commitment, a company would have to reattach managers to their own deep drivers—allow them to live their own values and act according to their own personal codes.

Share It With Others!

In order to help you, I’ve put together a few suggestions that will help you get the lowest raise possible. If you follow these steps, I guarantee everyone else in the department will fare better than you will and you can peacefully go about life without the burden of a higher tax bracket.

Share It With Others!

From the start, he treated SAS employees as he had always wanted to be treated. In return, he expected they would be more likely to stay as well as to align their behavior with organisational goals and give their best efforts. Few companies can boast of a performance record like SAS's and Goodnight believes the firm's culture is key. Its annual employee turnover rate of approximately 4% - versus the typical 20 percent experienced by companies in the software industry - provides additional data that support Goodnight's approach.
At a time when most companies are laying off workers, expecting their employees to work longer hours, and cutting back on benefits, SAS is a different story...
Employees also benefit from an unusual degree of autonomy. SAS has no dress code, no set work hours nor any limitation on annual sick days. The culture also has an egalitarian feel to it. Everyone there knows that Goodnight, in addition to his CEO duties, spends time writing code like many of them.

Share It With Others!

there used to be a psychological contract: It used to be, we'll take care of you. Now it's more like: Take care of yourself and maybe we'll help if we're in a good mood. People criticize young people for having no loyalty...But why do they owe anybody loyalty? They and their parents have been treated like shit...
You hear a lot of slogans about how companies need "talent." But in the real world, it's hard to believe companies are thinking about talent right now...At any one time, an organization must do three things: Make money...innovate, and keep and maintain talent. They don't always do those three things all at one time...
if you are one of the people with a bad job and a bad boss, the best thing to do is learn the fine art of emotional detachment and not giving a shit at the low moments of your life. That's humbling but it can be pretty constructive. You have to learn not to give a shit about company politics. It's the art of not letting it touch your soul.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT