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Links 1 through 10 of 33 by Just Mohit tagged socialmedia

See, what Google needs to do is make the ultimate time waster guide...
Can I do any of this on Google now? No.
Should I?
Yes.
Why? Because wasting time is big business. We spend billions, if not trillions, wasting time. Just ask the travel industry. Or the gaming industry. Or the movie industry. Or the music industry. Or the skiing industry.
And we want to waste time more productively.
This is where Google should play to its strength. They have the infrastructure to connect us to friends who want to help us waste time better. They still have a few people who will code it up. They still understand the web and mobile than most any other company. They still have those funny cars going around making cool maps
Google’s bonus should be based on how well its services have helped me waste my time more productively.
So far Google plays a very small role in helping me waste time, when compared to these newer “social” services

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But before you go starting a Corporate Blog Policy Task Force and taking meetings with lawyers, consider what you're really trying to accomplish. You probably want to make sure your employee-bloggers aren't sharing company secrets. Duh. You also want to make sure your employees aren't dissing your customers, or each other. And you probably want to make sure that your workers aren't posting compromising pictures of American Idol contestants on the company blog.
How can you accomplish this without inundating the blogosphere with Harvardesque legalese? With this two-word corporate blogging policy:
"Be professional."
If your employee-bloggers are posting the secret-sauce recipe, bad-mouthing customers, or distributing NSFW (not safe for work) art, fire them. And if you're concerned that your employees won't understand what you mean by "be professional," then you have a management problem or an employee problem. Or both.

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we attribute other people’s behavior to psychology and our own behavior to context...
They’re not different kinds of people than we were when we were their age. Human nature hasn’t changed. But behavior is motivation filtered through opportunity. One of the questions to ask yourself as a manager is, are they responding to opportunities that were different than opportunities I had and constraints that were different than constraints I had...
If the search costs for finding a new job are easier outside your company than inside your company, you’re communicating something to them about loyalty as well...
But it’s culturally very hard, because it accepts the fact that the employees who are on your front line, who may well be your best next employees in higher positions, have a much greater ability to search for opportunity than they used to. And so you can’t rely on them sticking around for however long you want them to stick around before you promote them

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Nina Paley has a fascinating interview (pdf) in the latest edition of Radical History Review...
"Real things are limited. If you don't take care of the field, or if you overgraze it, then there's not enough grass for the other sheep. With cultural works, it's the exact opposite. The more they're shared, the more valuable they become. People apply these ideas about scarcity to culture, and culture is not scarce. People are thinking of the "problem of abundance": the idea that people don't know what to do with abundance. But there is no tragedy of the cultural commons. I've read justifications of copyright where people say that if culture is shared too much the value of the work is diluted. Who came up with that idea? The opposite is true: works do not become less valuable the more they're shared; they become more valuable the more they're shared. What on earth are they talking about when they say that sharing dilutes the value of the work?"

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We are desperate to fill in every silence, every piece of stillness, with something–something we deem more desirable, more worthy than that stillness. Something we think is more important and urgent than that damning quiet underneath everything–that damning quiet that always exists. That quiet that starts to drives us crazy when we first notice it, in those brief moments when we accidentally drop our guard, and all the clamor we worked so hard to create dies down...
Stillness makes us nervous. Quiet is disturbing. The empty space is seen as the enemy...Inaction is like a death to us. If we stop, we think we will die...
I wonder if the more clamor we bring into our lives, the more this might be a sign that we are trying to run away from that empty space, and what it might reveal to us.
Because empty spaces are revealing. They reveal how you feel and what you think at any given moment. They bring you to observe the life around you.

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Yet, there was curiousity and anxiety about this new world, encapsulated in this sentence I’ve heard a million times: “Anyone can say anything!” Such anxiety about free speech ironically came from journalists who are the first to resist any move from the state to regulate the media.
If every citizen seemed to be ranting against the media on the net, this was matched by the shrinking space of the letters column in the papers, and the absence of any occasion where news channels apologise for their mistakes...
People loved it to see public figures accessible on Twitter, but making yourself accessible on social media has also backfired for some, bringing more than usual wrath when you’re down and out just because you are present thereto be pilloried.
Citizens may not have become journalists, but what has changed forever is that journalists have been brought down from their pedestals to be ordinary citizens. Champions of democracy, rejoice.

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# We Are Very Unlikely to Return to the DoubleTree Club Houston.
* Lifetime chances of dying in a bathtub: 1 in 10,455
* (National Safety Council)
* Chance of Earth being ejected from the solar system by the gravitational pull of a passing star: 1 in 2,200,000
* (University of Michigan)
* Chance of winning the UK Lottery: 1 in 13,983,816
* (UK Lottery)
* Chance of us returning to the DoubleTree Club Houston: worse than any of those
* (And what are the chances you’d save rooms for us anyway?)

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The Internet can't create new, clean toilets; but it can help us use the ones that already exist more efficiently! There are toilets in shopping malls, hotels, and cafes throughout our cities. The trick is to create a list of these toilets. And since creating this list will be time consuming and difficult, the best way to speed it up will be to get the users to do it themselves. If it works for Wikipedia listing trivia about every episode of every series of Star Trek, why shouldn't it work for this far more important cause? It will be a wikipedia for Indian toilets.
Here are some points on how it should work:

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why do these discussions often get so heated and personal? It is not because there's anything at stake -- most of us can't affect policy or shape public opinion, and much of what we argue about doesn't even affect us directly. Instead, we take it so personally because our worldviews are part of our identity. They are how we make sense of the world and ourselves. So if someone attacks a part of our worldview, we react as if we ourselves have been attacked. In public. So we respond accordingly, unwilling, for the most part, to accept that we might be wrong, or that the truth might be too complex for any of us to fathom -- or that this shit doesn't really matter.

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13. Blogging expands your world. From a reader's perspective, the sheer variety of content that blogging enables introduces one to ideas and content we may not otherwise have come across otherwise. There's a lot of such content out there, and over time we find out own filters to navigate this content. Thanks to blogs, I've learned much more about the world than I otherwise would have.
From a blogger's perspective, the world expands as much. Most of my close friends today are people I met through blogging -- many of them also bloggers. At a personal level, this is what I cherish most in my journey as a blogger -- the people I have met, the friends I have made. Much as I mock the term, maybe there is something to be said for 'social' media after all.

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