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Links 1 through 10 of 14 by Just Mohit tagged policy

It is particularly heartening to note that there are persons in India who are determined to wreck one of the few industries where India has achieved world class and where Indian companies are considered formidable operators. I brought to the attention of the finance minister of China the fact that Indian IT companies who till the other day were poster boys of India are now being harassed despite earlier explicit and emphatic assurances that on-site project implementation revenues would be treated as export income. The finance minister of China was salivating. He is now looking forward to global corporations and for that matter, Indian IT companies are moving more and more of their activities to China. He plans to write to you in order to congratulate you on the wonderful steps that your government is taking that will be of immense benefit to China.
Sincerely yours,
Finance Minister of the Philippines

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before deriding Anna Hazare's movement as undemocratic and dangerous, two adjectives that appear time and again in criticism against Jantar Mantar, it is important to assess how undemocratic and dangerous India's administrative failures have become...
Of course Jantar Mantar was a circus. Of course it bypassed the democratic process. Of course it was cleverly positioned during a lull in 24x7 news events. But do consider that the cosy, corrupt system challenged by the jamboree is itself a daily circus that undermines and bypasses the democratic process...
We condone criminal violations of the law and Constitution, wink and laugh at them or simply don't care because at the end of the day we smirk and say, "We are like this only". India's ruling classes, comfortable with the status quo, are supremely isolated from its administrative anarchy. So, Jantar Mantar felt like anarchy to them. So, they criticise endlessly instead of pushing for real, urgent change.

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But before you go starting a Corporate Blog Policy Task Force and taking meetings with lawyers, consider what you're really trying to accomplish. You probably want to make sure your employee-bloggers aren't sharing company secrets. Duh. You also want to make sure your employees aren't dissing your customers, or each other. And you probably want to make sure that your workers aren't posting compromising pictures of American Idol contestants on the company blog.
How can you accomplish this without inundating the blogosphere with Harvardesque legalese? With this two-word corporate blogging policy:
"Be professional."
If your employee-bloggers are posting the secret-sauce recipe, bad-mouthing customers, or distributing NSFW (not safe for work) art, fire them. And if you're concerned that your employees won't understand what you mean by "be professional," then you have a management problem or an employee problem. Or both.

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"The government today said telecom operators will have to stop any such services that can not be monitored as per the satisfaction of law enforcement agencies. BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion (RIM) has been saying that it cannot provide access to the popular BlackBerry Enterprise Service (BES) as it does not possess any key and the security architecture is the same around the world."...
Either I missed the outrage or no one cares as much about this issue. And to those who argue this is a necessary security measure, I ask them to keep the doors of their houses open because, you know, most terrorist attacks are planned in closed structures.

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It’s been a hell of a year for consumer privacy, or the lack thereof...
Now Congress is debating new privacy laws and the FTC has weighed in with proposals for a No Tracking List to thwart nosy Web advertisers...the online data industry immediately began trash talking the FTC’s ideas, calling for even more ‘self regulation’...
Apparently, the 10 years online data mongers have been given to come up with privacy protections that actually protect privacy hasn’t been enough. Just give them another 10 years and they promise they’ll get it right.
I’ve got a better solution. Instead of a welter of new laws or regulations, how about just one: The Honest Privacy Policy Act. The HPPA would require every company to post a simple, direct, and brutally honest policy detailing what really happens to your data.
To help this proposal along I’ve come up with one of my own – and it’s 5,085 words shorter than Facebook’s. Here’s what a real privacy policy might look like:

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some of my HR colleagues are real dunces. I know because people write me and tell me about them all the time. And when you run into one of these, there are times you must, must, must push back. HR is not outside the company structure. They report into somebody...
Because your job as a manager is to make the business profitable, and you do that by hiring, retaining, and developing the best people, don’t let HR stand in your way of doing just that. Here are 3 times when you must push back:
1. When the existing policy defies good sense.
2. You need to fire a poor performer.
3. HR wants your employees (and you!) to attend a ridiculous training.

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Now what should be done at the Babri site—I honestly believe (and I am sure I am not the only one) that, in order to please everyone, we should construct a gigantic shopping mall- multiplex complex. Why? Because a mall is the temple of modern India...as it is constructed in the name of the one God that unites us all—- Hindu, Muslim, Christian, Sikh, Himmeshites. The Capitalist God, the most secular of them all. Vulgar and ostentatious He may be but at least when He peddles false hopes of salvation by making you sacrifice your money, He discriminates against no one.
And that perhaps is not a bad thing after all.

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Netflix's roughly 600 salaried employees can vacation any time they desire for as long as they want – provided that their managers know where they are and that their work is covered...
when we design systems that assume bad faith from the participants, and whose main purpose is to defend against that nasty behaviour, we often foster the very behaviour we're trying to deter. People will push and push the limits of the formal rules, search for every available loophole, and look for ways to game the system when the defenders aren't watching. By contrast, a structure of rules that assumes good faith can actually encourage that behaviour.
So if you think people in your organisation are predisposed to rip you off, maybe the solution isn't to build a tighter, more punitive set of rules. Maybe the answer is to hire new people.
To paraphrase one Netflix executive, the company doesn't have a clothing policy either. But – so far at least – nobody has shown up to work naked.

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The organic co-existence of the farmer who raises cows gives him a legitimacy over his livestock...
there is a disconnect between the realities of lower Hindu castes, Dalits, tribal people, Christians and Muslims who rear cattle, and that of a few cultural elites from the Brahmin and Brahminised upper castes who don’t like to get their hands dirty doing manual labour, but construct a theory of the sacred cow. And the latter somehow always wins over the former...
The right to one’s food preference has to be respected just as much as another’s right to avoid a particular food. Problems arise when a particular school of thought on food influences the state, and passes laws in its favour. Such actions are simply not democratic, and in this case, ahistorical, and will prove detrimental for the rural economy.

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Wheat and rice are today the main global food crops...Wheat is the raw material for a variety of food and drink: from flour to cakes; pasta to couscous; beer to biscuits.
If more Indian wheat rots, it could drive global prices up further, the Associated Press reported last week, because though India’s wheat isn’t intended for export, it is counted in global wheat stocks.
India has banned exports of non-basmati rice and wheat since 2007, save for “humanitarian purposes”, for fear it could increase food prices. But prices have surged anyway because India can’t reach food to those who need it.
To the government, the export of wheat and rice is politically sensitive. “It’s impossible, it can’t be done,” a minister told me. Why not? On Wednesday, MPs in Parliament asked the same question.
India’s grain stockpile is now an international shame. Finding a creative way of getting it to the poor is the best solution. Exporting it is another. Letting it rot isn’t.

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