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Links 1 through 10 of 31 by Just Mohit tagged internet

I derive a certain comfort from looking over, and being surrounded by, my laden shelves. They are my refuge from a world that I have found difficult to negotiate

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Nearly 25 years later, I’m a little more grown-up and the idea of banning things, especially creative works, still makes no sense to me. These days, what’s coming on the ban radar seems more ridiculous than ever before...
I’m not sure what is more difficult to explain—that Reliance Entertainment thought Dangerous Ishq would have box-office earnings, or that anyone would want to waste bandwidth, time and storage space on the film

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" Create a service experience around what you publish and sell. Whatever “customer service” means when it comes to books and authors, figure it out and do it. Do it in partnership with your readers. Turn your readers into members. Not visitors, not subscribers

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(3 digital anecdotes)
I take two lessons from the mouth of babes: if something is not interactive, with mouse or gestures, it is broken. And, the internet is not about computers or devices; it is something mythic, something much larger; it is about humanity.

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Nina Paley has a fascinating interview (pdf) in the latest edition of Radical History Review...
"Real things are limited. If you don't take care of the field, or if you overgraze it, then there's not enough grass for the other sheep. With cultural works, it's the exact opposite. The more they're shared, the more valuable they become. People apply these ideas about scarcity to culture, and culture is not scarce. People are thinking of the "problem of abundance": the idea that people don't know what to do with abundance. But there is no tragedy of the cultural commons. I've read justifications of copyright where people say that if culture is shared too much the value of the work is diluted. Who came up with that idea? The opposite is true: works do not become less valuable the more they're shared; they become more valuable the more they're shared. What on earth are they talking about when they say that sharing dilutes the value of the work?"

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Reading is an act of contemplation, perhaps the only act in which we allow ourselves to merge with the consciousness of another human being. We possess the books we read...but they possess us also, filling us with thoughts and observations, asking us to make them part of ourselves...books enlarge us by giving direct access to experiences not our own. In order for this to work, however, we need a certain type of silence, an ability to filter out the noise.
Such a state is increasingly elusive in our over-networked culture, in which every rumor and mundanity is blogged and tweeted. Today, it seems it is not contemplation we seek but an odd sort of distraction masquerading as being in the know. Why? Because of the illusion that illumination is based on speed, that it is more important to react than to think...
Here we have my reading problem in a nutshell, for books insist we take the opposite position, that we immerse, slow down.

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"Money is like gasoline during a road trip," he says. "You don't want to run out of gas on your trip, but you're not doing a tour of gas stations. You have to pay attention to money, but it shouldn't be about the money."...
During a particularly memorable meeting, a banker advised him to focus less on work that was interesting and more on work of the moneymaking kind...
"You don't fish with strawberries," the banker says. "Even if that's what you like, fish like worms, so that's what you use."
At first, O'Reilly accepts this advice...But as he thinks it over, he begins to see things differently. "[A] small voice within me said, with a mixture of dismay, wonder, and dawning delight: 'But that's just what we've always done: gone fishing with strawberries,' " he writes. "And it's worked!...I like to think that we have the capability to fish with worms when necessary, but in general, we're farmers, not fishermen, and strawberries go over just fine."

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Whether you’re into classics, mysteries, or a fluffy romance novel, it can sometimes be a challenge to find new books to fall in love with. However, the Internet is full of great sites that can help you get connected with books that you’ll really enjoy reading. Check out these communities, review sites, and other outposts of quality books to discover great stories

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The Internet can't create new, clean toilets; but it can help us use the ones that already exist more efficiently! There are toilets in shopping malls, hotels, and cafes throughout our cities. The trick is to create a list of these toilets. And since creating this list will be time consuming and difficult, the best way to speed it up will be to get the users to do it themselves. If it works for Wikipedia listing trivia about every episode of every series of Star Trek, why shouldn't it work for this far more important cause? It will be a wikipedia for Indian toilets.
Here are some points on how it should work:

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Concentrated, linear thought doesn't come naturally to us, and the Web, with its countless spinning, dancing, blinking, multicolored and goodie-filled margins, tempts us away from it. (E-mail, that constant influx of the social acknowledgment craved by our monkey brains, may pose an even more potent diversion.) "It's possible to think deeply while surfing the Net," Carr writes, "but that's not the type of thinking the technology encourages or rewards." Instead, it tends to transform us into "lab rats constantly pressing levers to get tiny pellets of social or intellectual nourishment."

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