Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 75 by Joseph Kraus tagged data_curation

Suddenly it seems everyone wants to re-imagine scientific communication. From the ACS symposium a few weeks back to a PLoS Forum, via interesting conversations with a range of publishers, funders and scientists, it seems a lot of people are thinking much more seriously about how to make scientific communication more effective, more appropriate to the 21st century and above all, to take more advantage of the power of the web. For me, the “paper” of the future has to encompass much more than just the narrative descriptions of processed results we have today. It needs to support a much more diverse range of publication types, data, software, processes, protocols, and ideas, as well provide a rich and interactive means of diving into the detail where the user in interested and skimming over the surface where they are not.

Share It With Others!

Sponsored by Board on Research Data and Information,
Policy and Global Affairs Division and US CODATA in collaboration with CODATA-ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation Standards and Practices. Address questions, such as: Why are the attribution and citation of scientific data important? What are the major technical issues that need to be considered in developing and implementing scientific data citation standards and practices? What are the major scientific issues that need to be considered in developing and implementing scientific data citation standards and practices? Which ones are universal for all types of research and which ones are field- or context- specific? What are the major institutional, financial, legal, and socio-cultural issues that need to be considered in developing and implementing scientific data citation standards and practices? Which ones are universal for all types of research?

Share It With Others!

Librarians at the University of Minnesota have stepped up to help researchers manage their digital data and, in the process, have highlighted the value of the University Libraries within the larger institution. Under the direction of Lisa Johnston, a research services librarian at the University Libraries and a codirector of the University Digital Conservancy (UDC), the library has created a program called Managing Your Data, which guides researchers in the creation of data management plans (DMP). "Research is something that faculty care about. This program allows us to start a conversation with faculty in new ways that our more traditional library roles might not have before," Johnston said. "And something amazing happens in this conversation, faculty listen to us. They see our expertise in the areas of open access, public distribution of information, and long-term preservation and look to us for best practices and principles to incorporate into their research," she said.

Share It With Others!

If you ever get a sinking feeling that all your photos and correspondence stored digitally may one day be lost in a computer crash or due to some future software incompatibility, then you might empathize with the folks who spend their professional lives thinking about ways to ensure digital forms of cultural heritage don’t disappear into the ether. In fact, yesterday and today, people concerned with preserving digital 3D visualizations of ancient sites and other digital cultural heritage objects are meeting in London for a conference entitled Visualizations and Simulations, organized under the POCOS (Preservation of Complex Objects Symposia) banner.

Share It With Others!

"The opportunity: data explosion = demand explosion. Specifically, demand for: Talent: In a growing number of instances, there is a lack of skilled labor to mine and manage big data. The need to properly analyze data to make informed decisions is a demand that will grow along with the spike in data availability."

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

This is a site for large data sets and the people who love them: the scrapers and crawlers who collect them, the academics and geeks who process them, the designers and artists who visualize them. It's a place where they can exchange tips and tricks, develop and share tools together, and begin to integrate their particular projects.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

A Data Reference Pedagogy -- by Kristin Partlo -- As a social science data librarian at Carleton College, a small undergraduate campus with a distributed data support model, I consider myself to be situated somewhere between a general reference librarian and a data specialist, with a foot firmly planted in each professional culture. I have found the reference interview2 to be a rich site for
examining and bridging the practices, values and expertise of the two specializations, especially as we have reflected on an appropriate level of research data support for our liberal arts campus. Because my work is at a confluence of many different levels of the organization, namely librarians, staff, students and faculty, I have come to realize that my reflections may be extrapolated to larger campuses where more individuals and organizations are involved in supplying data support across the campus.

Share It With Others!

Authored by Tyler Walters and Katherine Skinner, the report looks at how libraries are developing new roles and services in the arena of digital curation for preservation. The authors consider a “promising set of new roles that libraries are currently carving out in the digital arena,” describing emerging strategies for libraries and librarians and highlighting collaborative approaches through a series of case studies of key programs and projects. They also provide helpful definitions and offer recommendations for libraries considering how best to make or expand their investments in digital curation. Issues and developments within and across the sciences and humanities are considered.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT