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Links 1 through 10 of 474 by Joanna Geary tagged business

The internet has changed patterns of supply and demand in media businesses in profound ways. We're not going back to the way things used to be. But it's a mistake to assume that the contours of the landscape in the immediate aftermath of the disruption are the permanent contours of the landscape.

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The internet has changed patterns of supply and demand in media businesses in profound ways. We're not going back to the way things used to be. But it's a mistake to assume that the contours of the landscape in the immediate aftermath of the disruption are the permanent contours of the landscape.

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There are several catalysts for jump-starting progress, but managers can begin to break negative cycles and get positive progress loops going if they start with three fundamentals: meaningful work, clear goals, and autonomy. Be sure that people understand how their own work contributes to something they can care about — a mission with meaning. Establish clear goals for projects, so people know what they are working toward, but allow them autonomy to use their own talents and expertise to get there. Ideally, those goals will include interim, achievable milestones, so small wins will happen early and often. Above all, pay attention. Stay alert to the progress inhibitors that reduce the probability of small wins, and neutralize those inhibitors as much as possible.

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What's interesting is that neither team consciously decided not to collaborate. Instead they did what came naturally, which is to work either completely or partially on their own. The reality is that true collaboration is difficult. It requires subordinating individual goals to collective achievement; it means engaging in tough, emotional give-and-take discussions with colleagues about strategies and ideas; and it often leads to working in new ways that may not be comfortable or easy. So given these difficulties, most teams find it easier to talk about collaboration rather than do it.

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Knowledge Tools of the Future argues that companies trying to differentiate themselves around innovation and creativity rather than efficiency and cost will turn to the array of devices, systems, methodologies, and services sometimes called the “intelligent web.” These tools exploit things like semantic Web functions, microformats, and recommendation agents to provide a more productive and intuitive experience for users.

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“You guys, are geared to compete rather than collaborate. You’re not getting that collaboration is the new name for the game”. “Even among yourselves, you are unable to cooperate on key industrial issues, shooting yourselves in the foot as a result”. “Your internal organizations are still plagued by a culture of silos. The winners will be the ones  who break silos”.

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This shows how misguided current measurement systems are. Today’s obsession with the “Unique Visitor” metric drives the advertising market —and competition among news sites. Such fixation encourages an arms race in which, by all means necessary (games, fake URLs), news sites will shoot for an increase in their numbers of UVs and for the resulting ranking improvement. This is short-sighted: loyal readers—roughly the top 10% that will generate 80% of the page views —should be the measure of choice.

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The idea of the magazine will be reimagined tomorrow night in New York City, with a collaborative event between Pop-Up Magazine and ESPN: The Magazine. Contributors to The New Yorker, This American Life, Wired, Slate, and other publications will get onstage at the Skirball Center for a one-night event, a "magazine" that is performed just once. Less a frantic reaction to the perils of magazine publishing than a clever attempt to re-frame it, the event is a landmark, in different ways, both for Pop-Up and ESPN. But how important is it for the publishing business at large?

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ndividual brands are part of the media landscape now, and talented, ambitious writers will naturally concern themselves with them and seek to enhance them. But while they have to contend with fragmented reader habits, institutional brands remain important too, and the two can be made to work together rather than in opposition.

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Starting today, Facebook users will be able to tag Pages in their photos. Page tagged photos will adhere to a user’s privacy settings, and will only appear on a Page’s Photos tab if set to be visible to everyone. Initially, Facebook is only allowing Pages categorized as “Brands & Products” or “People” to be tagged, but it says it is “looking to expand this functionality to more Page categories over time.”

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