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Links 1 through 10 of 23 by José Lise tagged Economist

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The euro crisis
The growth problem
Mar 7th 2012, 16:21 by R.A. | WASHINGTON

IT ISN'T too difficult to find praise for Mario Draghi these days, and, indeed, those economies whose primary exposure to Europe's troubles is via financial market jitters are quite happy that he seems (for the moment anyway) to have done a very nice job propping up European banks. Britain and central Europe may be still be sweating, but other big economies are doing much better than they were in December, thank you.

Which is a shame, in a way, because more dissatisfaction with Mr Draghi might return a focus to how miserably the European Central Bank is handling the European economy as a whole. Paul Krugman provides one view of its troubles, which amount to much more of a near-Depression than America experienced:

So we had a 28 percent decline in industrial production peak to trough in 1929 , versus around 18 this time. By year 5 of the original Depression, output had recovered to 86 percent of its previous peak

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