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Links 1 through 10 of 13 by Jay Cross tagged clojay+Networks

The Internet is so pervasive that Internet values are blowing back into real life.

For example, I have no qualms about walking out of a boring presentation, even if I’ve been sitting in the front row. The Web trained me to click past unrewarding pages and spend my time where it will do me the most good.

I expect attitudes like Internet values to underpin exemplary corporate learning in the future. Here are nine more to ponder.

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Business has already squeezed the big process improvements out of its physical systems. But for many companies, collaboration and networking processes are virgin territory. The upside potential is staggering; people innovating, sharing, supporting one another—all naturally and without barriers. The traditional approach has been to automate routine tasks in order to reduce cost; the new vision is to empower people to take advantage of their innate desire to share, learn together and innovate.

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Training is something that’s pushed on you; learning is something you choose. Many a knowledge worker will tell you, “I love to learn but I hate to be trained.” Knowledge workers thrive when given ...

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Match learning needs with web 2.0 solutions. The reference pages that follow are meant to give you a bit of background and some places to get your questions answered. Most of this will soon be obsolete. Please add new things when you find them.

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(Heraclitus) of Ephesus wrote, “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man. Everything flows and nothing abides. Even sleepers are workers and collaborators on what goes on in the universe. If we do not exepect the unexpected, we will never find it.” He was ahead of his time.

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Training departments of yore focused most of their energy on events and processes to push information, much of it prepackaged. Wikis pull people to learn when they feel the need. The information they find largely is created by the users themselves.

Companies are discovering wikis are a way to share knowledge, store the "rules of thumb" of work communities, keep documentation current, cut e-mail bottlenecks and eliminate duplicate effort. They are also lightweight technology. And they're cheap.

The downside is that wikis are weird.

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What would you think of an assembly line where workers didn't know where to find the parts they were supposed to attach "Hey! Anybody see any fenders"

Absurd, you say. Heads would roll. Yet for knowledge workers, this is routine. Consider a knowledge worker stymied by a lack of information-hardly an uncommon situation. In fact, in many professions, knowledge workers spend a third of their time looking for answers and helping their colleagues do the same.

How does our knowledge worker respond She's five times more likely to turn to another person than to an impersonal source, such as a database or a file cabinet.

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ecent advances in information technology, such as podcasting, will profoundly impact knowledge management, corporate training and in-house communication. Just as blogging gave us all a personal printing press, podcasting gives us an inexpensive, personal broadcasting studio. Subscribers can download short radio shows to their iPods or MP3 players. Microsoft recently threw its weight behind the open-source software that makes all this happen. We'll soon reach the tipping point.

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Ten years ago, most business executives saw no value in the Internet beyond possibly cheaper communications. CIO magazine's December 1994 issue sheepishly proposed "not to laud the future of electronic commerce nor to cheerlead the creation of a great national network that, like Godot, may never materialize."

A representative skeptic said, "So far, I haven't seen anybody use the Internet for anything that was all that worthwhile." Another CIO chimed in, saying "There's so much non-business stuff on the Internet that you have to wonder if people are getting their jobs done."

Ten years, not that long ago, 38 million people had Internet access. Next year, Internet users will top a billion. The pros missed a sea change.

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