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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by Jay Cross tagged clojay+Management

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In the five years since the publication of Informal Learning, I’ve become the Johnny Appleseed of informal learning. I didn’t invent the concept. Informal learning is older than civilization. My contribution has been pointing out that overemphasis on formal learning in organizations is dysfunctional, uneconomic, bad business, and not a whole lot of fun.

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In the old days, corporate training departments focused solely on workers on the payroll. Most of the effort went into getting novices up to speed and grooming fast-trackers as future leaders. Training departments largely overlooked improving the skills of seasoned employees, despite the fact that these were the people whose efforts were paying the bills.

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To “earn a seat at the table” where the business managers sit, you must:
Speak the language of businessBehave like an officer of the corporationThink like a business personAct like a business person

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The doyenne of performance support, remembered by two fervent admirers

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People inevitably shortchange the future by investing all of their energy in the present. Take the practice of management; it’s whirling around in a squirrel cage, running hard and going nowhere. Management values (e.g., control, precision, stability, discipline, and reliability) have not changed in a century. Business has streamlined strategy, production, services, and operations. We’ve cut the inefficiencies from every business process but the most important: management itself.

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It struck me that leaders needed not only to work on skills but also to work on themselves. Leading a team into uncharted territory required confidence and self-knowledge. Successful leaders knew who they were, were mindfully aware of what was going on around them, and exuded confidence that they could get the job done. My marketing antennae told me this personal empowerment angle would also make for a popular course.

At the time I was doing my research, Harvard Business School’s John Kotter was championing the concept that leaders and managers are entirely different breeds. The manager keeps things on track; the leader breaks through obsolete boundaries. Managers control; leaders inspire.

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