Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 101 by Ho John Lee tagged microsoft

In this report, we examine the privacy features1 available in five Web browsers – Chrome 7, Firefox 3.6 and 4.0 beta 6, Internet Explorer 8 and 9 Beta2, Opera 10.6, and Safari 5. In the charts below, we compare the features offered by each browser in five areas: general privacy controls, privacy modes, cookie controls, object controls, and geolocation controls. All of the browsers were tested on Windows 7, except for Safari, which was tested on Mac OS X, where it is predominantly used. We provided a draft of this document to Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, and Opera several weeks in advance to allow them to verify the accuracy of the claims made in the report about their browser software. Where appropriate, we have revised the report in response to the feedback we received from those companies.

Summary: No one browser stands out as the clear privacy leader. All have relative strengths and all have relative weaknesses; depending on how you use the Web (e.g. for location-enabled

Share It With Others!

With our most recent release, there’s no longer any restriction on the types of files that can be uploaded to SkyDrive via our API. As part of this change, we’ve also changed our policies to allow apps to back up a user’s data to SkyDrive.

One question that has since come up is how apps should store data so that app backups don’t end up cluttering up a user’s SkyDrive. Our recommendation is that apps should store data using the following folder hierarchy:

[SkyDrive root]
'- ApplicationData
'- [Application Name] ([Publisher Name or Company Name])
e.g. Photosky (Contoso)

The application name should be provided as a human readable name that the end user understands, while the publisher name should be included in parenthesis in the folder name to disambiguate your app from another app that may have the same name.

Share It With Others!

September 2011
Summary

Imagine a world where you don't have to worry about authentication. Imagine instead that all requests to your application already include the information you need to make access control decisions and to personalize the application for the user.

In this world, your applications can trust another system component to securely provide user information, such as the user's name or email address, a manager's email address, or even a purchasing authorization limit. The user's information always arrives in the same simple format, regardless of the authentication mechanism, whether it's Microsoft® Windows® integrated authentication, forms-based authentication in a web browser, an X.509 client certificate, or something more exotic. Even if someone in charge of your company's security policy changes how users authenticate, you still get the information, and it's always in the same format. This is the utopia of claims-based identity that A Guide to Claims-Based Identity and

Share It With Others!

On June 7, as part of the spring release of Windows Azure, we announced the developer preview for Windows Azure Active Directory. The developer preview adds two major capabilities to the Windows Azure Active Directory service that we described in Part 1 of this post. First, it enables developers to connect to and use information in the directory through an easy-to-use REST interface. Second, it allows developers to connect to the organizational single-sign-on (SSO) capabilities of Windows Azure Active Directory—the same capabilities that are currently used by Microsoft Office 365, Windows Intune, and other Microsoft products.

The developer preview, which will be available soon, builds on capabilities that Windows Azure Active Directory is already providing to customers. These include support for integration with consumer-oriented Internet identity providers such as Google and Facebook, and the ability to support Active Directory in deployments that span the cloud and enterprise

Share It With Others!

But for many smaller organizations, building and maintaining an identity management system and the associated application integration has been too hard and too costly to consider. Even organizations that have successfully deployed identity management solutions are looking for ways to make identity management easier and to broaden its reach.

Here in part 1 of a two-part posting, we will look at how the use of cloud architectures and cloud economies of scale is enabling us to offer Active Directory as a turnkey service at a cost that puts this powerful collection of capabilities within reach of essentially everyone—even small organizations without an IT staff. We see this as very important. It opens the door to “democratizing” identity management so it becomes a foundational capability that every organization and every software developer can count on—no matter what platform or technology base they are building from.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Google’s Knowledge Graph derives from Freebase, a proprietary graph database acquired by Google in 2010 when it bought Metaweb. Google's Thakur, who is technical lead on Knowledge Graph, says that significant additional development has been done to get the database up to Google’s required capacity. Based on some of the architecture discussed by Google, Knowledge Graph may also rely on some batch processes powered by Google’s Pregel graph engine, the high-performance graph processing tool that Google developed to handle many of its Web indexing tasks—though Thakur declined to discuss those sorts of details.

Microsoft’s Satori (named after a Zen Buddhist term for enlightenment) is a graph-based repository that comes out of Microsoft Research’s Trinity graph database and computing platform. It uses the Resource Description Framework and the SPARQL query language, and it was designed to handle billions of RDF “triples” (or entities). For a sense of scale, the 2010 US Census in RDF form ha

Share It With Others!

Ubi's system uses a Microsoft Kinect sensor to turn a regular projector into a multi-touch PC projection system, where regular PowerPoints, web pages, even games no longer require clickers or wireless mice to be navigated. By using the motion-tracking and depth-perception cameras in the Kinect, Ubi is able to detect where a user is pointing, swiping and tapping on a surface and interpret these gestures as if they were being performed on a giant touchscreen or interactive whiteboard.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT