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Links 1 through 10 of 59 by Ho John Lee tagged entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurs also display a striking number of mental oddities. Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and foundEntrepreneurs also display a striking number of mental oddities. Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said that they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers. Prominent dyslexics include the founders of Ford, General Electric, IBM and IKEA, not to mention more recent successes such as Charles Schwab (the founder of a stockbroker), Richard Branson (the Virgin Group), John Chambers (Cisco) and Steve Jobs (Apple). There are many possible explanations for this. Dyslexics learn how to delegate tasks early (getting other people to do their homework, for example). They gravitate to activities that require few formal qualifications and demand little reading or writing.

Attention-deficit disorder (ADD) is another entrepreneur-friend

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The Dilbert Principle observes that in the modern economy, the least capable people are promoted to management because companies need their smartest people to do the useful work. This creates a situation where you have more geniuses reporting to morons than at any time in history. In that sort of environment you'd expect the geniuses to be looking for a way out, even if Plan B has a low chance of success.

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I’m sure I’ll spark the ire of some VC’s for saying so, but there is certainly such a thing as black-out days in venture capital. It’s worth you knowing this so you don’t waste your time. It’s also very important to understand so that you can properly plan when you raise money.

Let me first tell you the black-out periods and then I’ll explain why. It is very difficult to raising venture capital between November 15 – January 7th. It is also very hard to raise VC from July 15 – September 7th. (you need to have had your first meeting even earlier.) If you’re thinking about raising VC and have not yet started the process, you’ve probably already missed the boat for 2009.

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Unlike in established companies where the problem is known, and the focus can be on optimizing a solution, in startups both the solution and the problem are unknown. Startups don’t know if they have sufficiently defined the problem and the solution until customers vote with their wallets.

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Paul Graham articulates some reasons people aren't prepared for being in a startup.- You probably can't overcome anything so pervasive as the model of work you grew up with. So the best solution is to be consciously aware of that. As you go into a startup, you'll be thinking "everyone says it's really extreme." Your next thought will probably be "but I can't believe it will be that bad." If you want to avoid being surprised, the next thought after that should be: "and the reason I can't believe it will be that bad is that my model of work is a job."

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Presentation from Eric Ries constrasting agile, continuous deployment approaches to development with traditional software / product development

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"I recently met an entrepreneur who was raising money for his startup. Six months prior, he had raised seed money (<$1M) from one of the increasingly popular seed programs big venture firms are offering (big venture firms = roughly $100M fund and larger). As a potential investor, the first question I asked him is “is the big venture firm following on?”"

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128 slides from Netflix on values, organizational issues, and culture for companies depending on technology and creativity.

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