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Links 1 through 10 of 10 by Rob Friesel tagged reading

Maura Kelly, writing for The Atlantic: «Why the emphasis on literature? By playing with language, plot structure, and images, it challenges us cognitively even as it entertains. It invites us to see the world in a different way, demands that we interpret unusual descriptions, and pushes our memories to recall characters and plot details.»

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Great list posted over at Wondermark. (Via... Prismatic? @fogus? All of the above? *None* of the above?) Some familiar titles in there, and some others I've never heard of. Either way: "As if my to-read list weren't long enough..."

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At New York Magazine. I came in through William Gibson's list, but all the lists are fantastic.

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The companion page to Marty Halpern's anthology (which I'm currently reading), over at his blog (More Red Ink). Looks like a collection of blog posts about the anthology itself.

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via JH: <blockquote>I find it interesting that we are able to understand a message or meaning from a phrase that should not be taken literally.</blockquote>

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Keeping flagged for when I re-read (again? so soon?) within the next year or so.

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at Infinite Summer (via kapowee): "...and a writer has to recognize that each person who reads his novel reads a different book. Readers bring their intellect to the page just as the author does and each reader brings different knowledge and experience and history and bias. Each reader understands the book a bit differently. Each reader asks the novel different questions, and as a result each reader gets different answers, which explains why you are crazy for Confederacy of Dunces and your otherwise extremely intelligent attorney wife thinks you’re an idiot for laughing at it."

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