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Links 1 through 10 of 135 by Rob Friesel tagged design

Brian Krall does an overview of several UI/UX design patterns and discusses some of the problems associated with those patterns. He also discusses alternatives to those patterns, as well as arguments in favor of them.

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Frank Chimero: «So now we no longer buy the thing we want, we buy the shape of the thing we prefer.» Fantastic.

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Jessica Enders, writing for A List Apart: «You may have noticed that a more usable, intuitive flat UI form involves some degree of redundancy. It’s often not just one visual design component (e.g., color) that communicates difference. Instead, it might be color and shape, or color and size.» Tl;dr: if you have a flat design, be careful not to let you form elements blend in too much and get washed out.

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Tim Kadlec: «The point is not that we all need to be testing on Google Glass—time will tell how well that device does. The point is that here is a brand new device and form factor and they didn’t have to do a single thing to have get their site working on it.» He's speaking more broadly than just "do responsive design"; he's talking about progressive enhancement and some other foundational principles that should guide you as a front-end engineer. It's not always easy to work this way, but you should fight for it; remember: the rewards are rich.

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Ryan Singer (37signals): «It’s important to understand that a feature is not a situation. You can dig into a situation to learn what is valuable and what is not according to the goal. Digging into a feature definition doesn’t do that. It has no origin and no goal. Analyzing a feature definition leads you to play out all the things a person might value from the feature instead of learning what they actually value.»

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Stéphanie Walter writing for Smashing Mobile. This ran back at the end of May and I'm just now getting around to it. It's pretty long but still worth at least scanning. Even if you don't dive into all of the details, the headings are enough to give you some a list of not-necessarily-obvious thought-problems for your next project.

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«Hand Made in Canada. With Canadian Sweat and Tears.» Everything on here should seem like a no-brainer, but considering how familiar every image on the right is... Well: this is now required reading.

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Tyler Sticka, writing over at the Cloud Four blog, offers up a round-up or field guide of the styleguides, boilerplates, etc. that are out there -- including a spreadsheet to organize the patterns he found.

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David Newton writing for Smashing Magazine on the proposed picture element, Scott Jehl's polyfill, and some problems with the current fallback strategy.

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Oliver Reichenstein, writing for Information Architects. It's a long read, and some of it may seem a bit navel-gazing (how many "good vs. great design" articles can a person read before their eyes bleed? how many times can that Steve Jobs quote about "design is how it works" be abused?), but it all comes down to Fingerspitzengefühl.

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