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Links 1 through 10 of 1152 Euro Challenge's Bookmarks

We are updating our resources and have moved to Google+ Communities. Join the Euro Challenge Community to get the latest news from the euro area; post questions and comments about the Euro Challenge; and share experiences and strategies on 'how to prepare' for the Euro Challenge Competition.

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In mid 2012, the ECB made a forceful commitment to use its power to defend the euro, which subsequently strongly helped to calm markets and bring down borrowing costs for endangered Euro zone members. Other developments in 2012 include the adoption of the fiscal compact, the proposal for a banking union, and a revised aid package for Greece. These developments are presented in a nice overview by the Council on Foreign relations: "Crisis in Euroland: Year in Review"

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An important source for those preparing their presentations on the unemployment challenge. The "EU Employment and Social Situation Quarterly Review – March 2013" gives you a sense of the deteriorating situation in most of the EU Member States. The report says that "divergence continues to increase across Member States, translating into persistently growing labour market and social challenges, marked by ever higher unemployment at EU level".

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This is a useful article, since it elaborates on the various challenges Europe is facing, just as you students do when assessing one of the ten challenges. And although you will only be presenting on one challenge, it is always helpful to relate the particular challenge to other challenges. Next to that, you will be able to better understand the broader picture, which might help you find answers to the questions you will receive. So, enjoy reading!

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Mr. Lagos, former president of Chile, is quoted in an interview saying: 'It’s impossible to have a [European Central Bank] run on a sound basis when you have 16 distinct national fiscal policies.' Interesting article that should help students prepare for the "living with a single monetary policy" and "slow growth" challenge.

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Healthcare budgets constitute one of the largest chunks of public expenditure throughout the EU, and the associated industry is considered one of Europe’s success stories. Europeans consider healthcare as one of the benchmarks that sets the continent apart in terms of quality of life from other nations. But the ageing demographic, and the shock of the financial crisis have brought the contrast between Europe’s ideals and reality sharply into focus.

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Go to the Delegation of the European Union in the US website and find out more about the EU initiatives to foster Research and Development in the EU.

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(Euro Challenge moderator) The Italian elections that took place on the last weekend of February have had troubling implications for the Euro zone. The election outcome puts the political situation in Italy into a delicate situation, since their is no outright winner in both chambers of parliament. Financial markets have thus reacted negatively, and some commmentators see a return of the euro zone crisis.

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For those students working on the challenge "banking system weaknesses" the proposed legislation of the European Union on limiting the financial rewards paid to top bankers is a noteworthy development. New York Times: The European Union took a big step Thursday toward putting strict limits on the bonuses paid to bankers, hoping to discourage the risk-taking behavior that set off the financial crisis. If the measure, opposed by the British government, becomes European law, the coveted bonuses that many bankers receive would be capped at no more than equal to their annual salaries, starting next year. Only if a bank’s shareholders approved could a bonus be higher — and even then it would be limited to no more than double the salary.

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Reuters Website: The European Central Bank should move back toward traditional monetary policy and away from its current path which is too close to fiscal policy, ECB Governing Council member Jens Weidmann said on Monday

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