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Links 1 through 10 of 115 by Peter Smolowitz tagged garden

Growing Peppers. One key tool that you'll put to good use while growing green peppers are Epsom Salts. Use Epsom Salt for growing green peppers with help from the operator of a certified bio-dynamic nursery in this free video clip.

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Tip 1: Use Epsom salt in each planting hole.

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When planting the gardeners recommended several types of organic amendments to the soil including a tablespoon of epsom salt, composted organic material, and several pounds of horse manure. If you really want to know what your soil needs consider getting it tested from your loal Extension Service so you don’t amend with unnecessary components, or worse, create a toxicity.

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Add a bit of epsom salt to your soil before planting and supplement 1 tablespoon epsom per gallon of water as feed every now and then.

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In late February fertilize with a slow release organic food such as EB Stone Rose and Flower Fertilizer using two cups (one pound) per rose. If you are feeling generous add a cup of lime and a fourth cup of Epsom Salt and some alfalfa meal. Repeat this procedure after the first flush of blooms in late June. One more fertilization in late August completes the cycle.

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To fertilize, you can use a watering can containing one tablespoon of Epsom salt and/or ¼ cup of alfalfa meal per gallon of water. Mulch bare soil with alfalfa hay or shredded hardwood bark. For ongoing maintenance, spray the foliage every two weeks with a mixture of fish emulsion and seaweed.

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Work wonders with Epson Salt, here is a rule of thumb for feeding Epsom salt to both tomatoes and roses, add one teaspoon of salt for every foot of height. Sprinkle it in a circle around the stem and work it in. If the leaves are turning yellow and looking mineral deficient, mix the salt with some water and spray it directly on the plant. Use this mineral feast twice a month for great flowers and fruit.

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His idea to use Epsom salt — commonly added to bathwater or a foot soak to ease sore muscles — on his tomato plants came from a tip he read in a horticulture magazine, Sedillo said. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Advertisement -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "My tomato plants always did well, but they weren't like you see now," Sedillo said. "I put (Epsom salt) in warm water and sprayed the plants, and within the next day, there were hundreds of flowers on those plants and they produced to the maximum all year." Along with spraying the plants, Sedillo said he also takes a handful of Epsom salt and sprinkles it around the roots. Then wets the ground around it. Since using the Epsom salt, his tomatoes also taste better, he said. "They are just tremendously delicious," he said. "They are so sweet."

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Myth: Tomato blossom end rot is caused by irregular watering. Truth: That certainly may add to the plant's stress, but more likely the plant needs calcium. But wait, you say, soil tests show your soil is filled with calcium. Yes, but it's not in a form that the plant can access. Add about a quarter cup of Epsom salts into your potting mix when planting tomatoes, or later in the season if you develop a problem. Epsom salts, which are not really salt, also is good for roses. Stock up later in the season when prices may be lower.

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“One thing we do when we plant is put a Tums tablet and a tablespoon of Epsom salt in each hole,” said Cindy Wood, a Franklin County Master Gardener. “We don’t get blossom end rot.”

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