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Links 1 through 10 of 2084 Elmar Klausmeier's Bookmarks

I’m David McCandless, a London-based author, writer and designer. I’ve written for The Guardian, Wired and others. I’m into anything strange and interesting. These days I’m an independent data journalist and information designer. A passion of mine is visualizing information – facts, data, ideas, subjects, issues, statistics, questions – all with the minimum of words. I’m interested in how designed information can help us understand the world, cut through BS and reveal the hidden connections, patterns and stories underneath. Or, failing that, it can just look cool! My pet-hate is pie charts. Love pie. Hate pie-charts.

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Zur sicheren Verschlüsselung von Gesprächen und Textchats auf Mobiltelefonen gibt es das Protokoll ZRTP, das der NSA anscheinend größere Probleme macht. Es wird etwa in den Open-Source-Programmen RedPhone und Signal verwendet. Ihr Entwickler Moxie Marlinspike sagt: "Es ist sehr befriedigend, dass für die NSA die mit unseren Apps verschlüsselte Kommunikation wie ein Blick durch Milchglas ist." Entwickelt hat ZRTP unter anderen der Amerikaner Phil Zimmermann, der Mann, der den bis heute gebräuchlichsten Verschlüsselungsstandard für E-Mails und Dokumente geschaffen hat. Er ist bekannt unter der Abkürzung PGP, ausgeschrieben: Pretty Good Privacy - ziemlich gute Privatsphäre. Auch an diesem mehr als 20 Jahre alten Verschlüsselungsstandard beißen sich die NSA-Spione offenbar die Zähne aus. PGP gibt es heute in verschiedenen weiterentwickelten Varianten, die häufigste ist "GNU Privacy Guard" des deutschen Programmierers Werner Koch.

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For the NSA, encrypted communication -- or what all other Internet users would call secure communication -- is "a threat". In one internal training document viewed by SPIEGEL, an NSA employee asks: "Did you know that ubiquitous encryption on the Internet is a major threat to NSA's ability to prosecute digital-network intelligence (DNI) traffic or defeat adversary malware?" Software giant Microsoft, which acquired Skype in 2011, said in a statement: "We will not provide governments with direct or unfettered access to customer data or encryption keys." The NSA had been monitoring Skype even before that, but since February 2011, the service has been under order from the secret US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), to not only supply information to the NSA but also to make itself accessible as a source of data for the agency.

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To investigate more formally, I purchased some time on a computer cluster and downloaded a copy of the Wikipedia archives. I wrote a little program to go through each edit and count how much of it remained in the latest version.† Instead of counting edits, as Wales did, I counted the number of letters a user actually contributed to the present article. If you just count edits, it appears the biggest contributors to the Alan Alda article (7 of the top 10) are registered users who (all but 2) have made thousands of edits to the site. Indeed, #4 has made over 7,000 edits while #7 has over 25,000. In other words, if you use Wales’s methods, you get Wales’s results: most of the content seems to be written by heavy editors. But when you count letters, the picture dramatically changes: few of the contributors (2 out of the top 10) are even registered and most (6 out of the top 10) have made less than 25 edits to the entire site. In fact, #9 has made exactly one edit — this one!

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In her email to TechCrunch, Horvath says she felt “confused and insulted to think that a woman who was not employed by my company was pulling the strings.” She also said she felt bullied by someone with perceived power and influence over her personal relationship and her career at GitHub. In retrospect, Horvath said she feels like she should have handed in her resignation following the episode. While the above was going on, Horvath had what she referred to as an awkward, almost aggressive encounter with another GitHub employee, who asked himself over to “talk,” and then professed his love, and “hesitated” when he was asked to leave. Horvath was in a committed relationship at the time, something this other employee was well aware of, according to Horvath. The rejection of the other employee led to something of an internal battle at GitHub. According to Horvath, the engineer, “hurt from my rejection, started passive-aggressively ripping out my code from projects we had worked on t

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WUWT doesn’t run articles for hire, it is not nor has it ever been on the payroll of any company or organization (and that goes for me personally too), and it is managed mostly by myself with the help of about half a dozen volunteer moderators. That said, I do get some revenue from some Amazon book sales via their referral program, and from the wordpress.com sponsored advertising program which is a revenue sharing arrangement. Advertising is placed on WUWT by wordpress.com and WUWT gets a portion of the ad revenue from wordpress.com just like many other wordpress hosted blogs do. WUWT also gets occasional personal donations via the PayPal button on the right sidebar, and we sometimes sell promotional items such as coffee mugs, t-shirts, and calendars. One of the most humorous episodes of the “you are in the pay of some big oil/big activist outfit” meme WUWT often gets accused of came in December 2012 when our volunteer community cartoonist “Josh” in the UK decided to collect some

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OnePlus founder Carl Pei (who is Swedish-Chinese and speaks English with an American accent) came into our offices to emphasize that while there never seem to be enough OnePlus Ones, they're a real thing. "We set some goals for this year. Thirty thousand was a realistic goal, 50,000 was a pretty good goal and 100,000 was a stretch goal," he said. "We now aim to ship a million devices this year, and we've already surpassed half a million." The problem is that OnePlus has no idea how to predict demand for its hot phone. Because it makes so little money on each phone, it doesn't want to make more than it can sell. And it takes three months to request changes in volume from the company's screen manufacturer. The OnePlus One hasn't followed the typical rules of phone demand, Pei said. Typically, when a phone launches, there's strong demand for about two months and then it starts tapering off. But nobody's been able to match the OnePlus One's price/performance balance, so demand for

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There are several reasons why you might find subtree better to use: Management of a simple workflow is easy. Older version of git are supported (even before v1.5.2). The sub-project’s code is available right after the clone of the super project is done. subtree does not require users of your repository to learn anything new, they can ignore the fact that you are using subtree to manage dependencies. subtree does not add new metadata files like submodules doe (i.e. .gitmodule). Contents of the module can be modified without having a separate repository copy of the dependency somewhere else. In my opinion the drawbacks are acceptable: You must learn about a new merge strategy (i.e. subtree). Contributing code back upstream for the sub-projects is slightly more complicated. The responsibility of not mixing super and sub-project code in commits lies with you. How to use git subtree? git subtree is available in stock version of git available since May 2012 – 1.7.11+. The version installed

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Dabeaz LLC is David Beazley, an independent software developer and book author living in the city of Chicago. I primarily work on programming tools, provide custom software development, and teach practical programming courses for software developers, scientists, and engineers. I am best known for my work with the Python programming language where I have created several open-source packages (e.g., Swig and PLY). I am also the author of the Python Essential Reference (Addison-Wesley) and Python Cookbook, 3rd Ed. (O'Reilly). Although Python is my current language of choice, I also have significant experience with systems programming in C, C++, and assembly language.

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In other words, arrays in PHP 7 use about 2.5 times less memory on 32bit and 3.5 on 64bit (LP64), which is quite impressive. If you compare this to the previous zval implementation, one difference particularly stands out: The new zval structure no longer stores a refcount. The reason behind this, is that the zvals themselves are no longer individually allocated. Instead the zval is directly embedded into whatever is storing it (e.g. a hashtable bucket). While the zvals themselves no longer use refcounting, complex data types like strings, arrays, objects and resources still use them. Effectively the new zval design has pushed out the refcount (and information for the cycle-collector) from the zval to the array/object/etc. There are a number of advantages to this approach, some of them listed in the following: Zvals storing simple values (like booleans, integers or floats) no longer require any allocations. So this saves the allocation header overhead and improves performance by

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