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Links 1 through 10 of 11 by Laura Guertin tagged gigapan_psubw

RANDY SARGENT remembers the first time he explored the surface of Mars. It was 2004, and he was working as a computer scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California. The space agency's Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity had just landed on the planet's surface, and each rover carried a panoramic camera system designed to take a series of photographs that could be stitched together back on Earth.

"Seeing those panoramas, I was amazed at the sense of being present on Mars," Sargent says. "Once the image is above a certain size it's very explorable. Suddenly your navigating skills kick in. You can move around, remember locations and return to them. You lose yourself in it."

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The ability to capture extremely detailed panoramic views made up of hundreds of perfectly stitched individual photos is tremendously useful for scientists studying everything from rock outcrops to birds to microscopic organisms.

The creators of the GigaPan robot, which can automatically create zoomable gigapixel-scale images, announced eight winners of a science photography contest Nov. 11 at the Fine International Conference on Gigapixel Imaging for Science.

“Having access to such high-resolution images changes scientists’ relationships to images and the information they contain,” said Carnegie Mellon University robotics scientist Illah Nourbaksh, one of GigaPan’s inventors and an organizer of conference.

Created in 2006 by Carnegie Mellon and NASA, the GigaPan robotic camera mount can shoot hundreds of perfectly aligned images using almost any digital camera. After the photographer uploads the photos to a computer, photo-stitching software seamlessly merges them into a single...

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The first conference on gigapixel imaging took place at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, earlier this month. Scientists in a range of fields explained how super-high resolution images - easy to capture using a Gigapan robotic tripod - are helping them to view their research in a new light.

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Scientists are using a powerful tool for teaching and public engagement with science and the natural world for projects as diverse as analyzing Middle Eastern petroglyphs, monitoring an urban forest, archiving a museum insect collection, studying a collapsed honey bee colony, keeping tabs on glaciers, examining erosion in a jaguar reserve, and viewing Galápagos fish clustered into a bait ball. Users of the GigaPan system punch numbers into a keypad on a robotic mount for a digital camera, specifying how expansive they want their panorama to be. A microprocessor calculates the size and number of exposures needed for the pan and moves the camera accordingly. A small robotic finger pushes the shutter button for each exposure. These are stitched together to form a panorama with a resolution 1000 times that of HDTV. The largest GigaPan has 100 gigapixels. The final image contains more data than most personal computers can handle, so the system's developers created a massive server system...

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GigaPan—the ultra-zoomable imaging technology—is enabling novel research in archaeology, zoology, and many other scientific fields, experts said this week.

The system stitches thousands of closeup images together into panoramas of thousand-megapixel resolution, which are hosted at the Gigapan website and viewable from anywhere in the world.

Robotics professor Illah Nourbakhsh's CREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon University first created the technology, which uses a robotic camera mount, a software package, and a digital camera.

The lab initially received support from NASA's Ames Intelligent Robotics Group and Google to develop the system for Mars-bound rovers.

But in recent years, the team has also crafted an affordable (as low as $300) GigaPan tool and put it in the hands of scientists.

GigaPan workshops have since trained dozens of experts in diverse fields, including many who attended the Fine International Conference on Gigapixel Imaging for Science...

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This demo will show how to create an embedded gigapan with selected snapshots appearing below the gigapan.

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M. H. Nichols, G.B. Ruyle, I.R. Nourbakhsh (2009) Very-High-Resolution Panoramic Photography to Improve Conventional Rangeland Monitoring. Rangeland Ecology & Management: November 2009, 62(6), 579-582.

Rangeland monitoring often includes repeat photographs as a basis for documentation. Whereas photographic equipment and electronics have been evolving rapidly, photographic monitoring methods for rangelands have changed little over time because each picture is a compromise between resolution and area covered. Advances in image sensors, storage media, and image-processing software allow enormous amounts of information to be collected efficiently and inexpensively, so multiple pictures taken at full zoom can be combined into a single high-resolution panoramic image. This project was initiated to integrate very-high-resolution panoramic images with conventional rangeland monitoring methods addressing three resource management categories: riparian areas, wildlife, and invasive species.

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The GigaPan Youth Exchange project combines cultural inquiry, NASA imaging technology, and social media to let secondary-school students experience something of the life of their peers around the world. Using the GigaPan robotic camera and image exploration platform, the group of students are growing into a community of technologically aware young people who are knowledgeable about their own environment and understand and care about the problems their contemporaries face. Welcome to this glimpse into their journey!

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GigaPan Systems was established in 2008 as a commercial spin-off of a successful collaboration between researchers at NASA and Carnegie Mellon University that developed the breakthrough GigaPan System for creating high-resolution panoramic images. GigaPan Systems was founded to bring this powerful, high-resolution imaging capability to a broad audience. The GigaPan System allows experienced and novice photographers to create high-resolution panorama images more easily than ever before and the resulting GigaPan images offer viewers a new, unique perspective on the world. The GigaPan System is the first solution that offers everything needed to take high-resolution panoramic images in a single system: the robotic GigaPan Imager attachment for most digital cameras; the GigaPan Stitch Software software that automatically combines the thousands of images taken into a single image, and the GigaPan Viewer on the GigaPan.com site that enables the unique mega-high resolution viewing experience.

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GigaPan is the newest development of the Global Connection Project, which aims to help us meet our neighbors across the globe, and learn about our planet itself. GigaPan will help bring distant communities and peoples together through images that have so much detail that they are, themselves, the objects of exploration, discovery and wonder. We believe that enabling people to explore, experience, and share each other's worlds can be a transforming experience. Our mission is to make all aspects of the GigaPan experience accessible and affordable to the broadest possible community.

GigaPan consists of three technological developments: a robotic camera mount for capturing very high-resolution (gigapixel and up) panoramic images using a standard digital camera; custom software for constructing very high-resolution gigapixel panoramas; and, a new type of website for exploring, sharing and commenting on gigapixel panoramas and the detail our users will discover within them.

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