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Links 1 through 10 of 14 by David Bandurski tagged unrest

In an editorial today, the Chinese-language Global Times, a spin-off of China's official People's Daily, writes that it is wrong and worrisome to see young teens participating in political actions that seen recently in Sichuan, where thousands of residents of Shifang city turned out to protests the building of a molybdenum-cooper plant. The paper wrote: "Middle school students are not yet adults and their ideas are not yet fully mature. They are very emotional and highly sensitive . . . [They] can be easily swayed by adults, either toward a correct social mentality or in the wrong direction." "In every normal household," the paper continued, "the correct duty of middle school students is to study, and not to be encouraged to join events of a political nature." To this, journalist and CMP fellow Xiao Shu (笑蜀) responded: "For this purpose, all Party organizations must exit our schools, and no political events should be allowed. What does [GT editor] Hu Xijin think about this?"

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The Beijing News reports today that Hebei province is spending 250 million yuan (US$39.7 million) this year to send 15,000 Party and government personnel into the countryside to do "stability preservation" work (维稳工作) ahead of the 18th Party Congress to be held in October. The 15,000 "cadres" will be imbedded in 5,010 villages and tasked with ensuring "large-scale mass incidents (群体性事件) do not occur" between February 10, the date of commencement of the policy, and the October congress, an important national political event which will formalize a transition of China's top Party leadership.

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Foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei (洪磊) said yesterday that China urged congressional representatives in the United States against "indulging" the Dalai Lama, saying this amounted to support for "anti-China Tibetan separatism." The remarks came in response to a meeting on July 7 between the Dalai Lama and U.S. representatives, including House Speaker John Boehner and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

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The Southern Metropolis Daily reports today that Guangzhou's top Party leader, Zhang Guangning (张广宁), held a forum yesterday with migrant workers and Party and government cadres from Zengcheng (增城市) and Xintang Township (新塘镇), both areas where riots broke out on June 11. At the forum, Guang listed out what he saw as the three principal causes of the unrest: 1) Work on social management and the provision of social services has fallen behind economic growth; 2) Insufficient channels for the expression of popular will (民意). Zhang said "special management bodies" must be established so that migrant workers can voice their issues as they arise. He also said the government must face head on the social management problems exposed by the "6.11" incident.

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Caijing Online reported yesterday that the county-level city of Zengcheng in China's southern Guangdong province, where violent riots erupted one week ago, has offered rewards of 5-10,000 yuan to anyone coming forward with information about the "law-breaking criminals" involved in the unrest. The city said that informants who were migrant workers would be given the title "excellent migrant" (“优秀外来工) and offered local registrations. 

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In its second such editorial in as many days, the Chinese-language Global Times urges the authorities to deal firmly with those who express support for violent acts of retribution stemming from deep social grievances. Referencing a bomb attack on a government building in the city of Tianjin earlier this week, the editorial says: "Incidents like this in present-day China are labelled acts of 'opposition' by some if the party suffering attack has anything to do with the government. And these perpetrators are called 'heroes' by much of this kind of public opinion." Yesterday's editorial in the Global Times urged action against public personalities who have, says the paper, praised murderers as heroes: "A small number of personalities in China have openly supported such killers as Qian Mingqi (钱明奇) and Xia Junfeng (夏俊峰). This would not be accepted in any Western country, and they would in such cases be severely punished."

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An official news site in the city of Lichuan in Hubei province reports today that around 1,500 people hurled water bottles, eggs and garbage at police yesterday in an apparent protest against the suspicious death of a local official, Ran Jianxin (冉建新), earlier this month: http://bit.ly/l2GMV4
Ran reportedly died while in the custody of the procuratorate in Hubei's Badong County (巴东县). 

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People's Daily Online reports today that China's State Council has issued a "notice" to local governments across the country urging them to work harder to create jobs for college graduates, as a high level of joblessness among this segment of the population is a possible source of social unrest. The notice said relevant local departments must "strengthen the intensity of their work, developing employment opportunities across multiple channels, improving relevant policy measures, and urgently strengthening employment services, using all means to promote [the creation of] employment opportunities for college graduates."

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In several posts that rank among the top 20 today on Sina's microblog, or "weibo," platform, user Kaixin Xufeng (开心徐峰) reports information that apparently comes live from Libya. The posts seem to detail Chinese workers at a project in Libya as they deal with threats from Libyan protestors or groups of looters. A post yesterday evening at 7:40pm includes a picture of blue-clad Chinese workers in white hard hats, armed with clubs and organizing. The post reads: "A local driver says a group of hoodlums are heading our way. Everyone has gotten ready." In a post at 5am this morning, the user writes: "Thank you for everyone's support. We're all just fine right now. Thanks!" Readers can visit the Sina Microblog account by clicking on the headline above, but may be prompted to go through a simple registration process if they don't already have a Sina account (recommended). 

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An official release from China's Xinhua News Agency reporting and summarizing Mubarak's February 1 announcement that he would not seek re-election topped China's major internet news portals today. The Xinhua report focused on Mubarak and the content of his announcement, but explicitly avoided mention of the pro-democracy demonstrations that have rocked Egypt in recent days. The only reference to "protests" was a paraphrase of Mubarak's remarks about the exploitation of the unrest by political parties: "Mubarak said that the large-scale protest movements that have gone on for days have been used by various political parties to create chaos and violence." 

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