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Links 1 through 10 of 125 by David Bandurski tagged China

The CCP's official Red Flag journal has run a series of articles recently calling for stricter controls on online public opinion in China. A piece posted to the website of Seeking Truth on May 21 answered a question from a reader raising concerns about the phenomenon of the "human flesh search" (crowdsourced investigation and often hazing of individuals online) and personal privacy. Would this sort of thing happen in the West, the reader asked Red Flag journal. The journal responded: "As you say, 'human flesh searches', which gather widespread web user participation in the search for and provision of information . . . have an immense power that is difficult to estimate. . . But 'human flesh searches' are a double-edged sword. On the one hand, they can be advantageous in enforcing moral norms in society and carrying out supervision by public opinion [i.e., monitoring of power]; one the other hand they can harm the personal right to privacy and even cause the spread of online violence."

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An article from the CCP's Red Flag journal posted to the website of Seeking Truth argues today that there are now two types of media in China: traditional media (print and broadcast) and internet-based new media. Both, says the article, must push for social cohesion. Now, as China reaches it's "dream," is not the moment to upset the boat, it says. "Right now, it would be difficult for any country or organization to use economic or military means to check and prevent the great sailing ship of China's revival. But there are certain powers that hope to use the internet as a means to bring about the collapse of China. The Party media and various new media, and the internet masses, must maintain clear heads -- they must not change directions or banners. The closer we get to the shores of our dream, the easier it is to run aground."

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In a speech run on the front page of today's Democracy and Rule of Law, a journal published by the China Law Society, China's new chief of politics and law, Meng Jianzhu (孟建柱), said that media dealing with politics and law (and falling under his area of jurisdiction) must work to increase their credibility and reach even as they strictly abided by "correct guidance of public opinion" (a term synonymous with political control of the press). Meng reminded those within the politics and law press of the rapid changes to Chinese society and the rise of online media. "Toward this, politics and law media must maintain clear heads, they must not lose their political direction . . . and they must steadily innovate their propaganda content and their propaganda methods."

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Chen Liang (陈亮), a reporter for China National Radio's "Voice of China", said during an official forum on "journalistic social responsibility" on April 16 that the role of the media was not only to release information but also to "maintain correct guidance of public opinion." Guidance of public opinion is official Chinese Communist Party jargon emphasizing the need of the Party to maintain social and political stability through control of the media and public opinion.

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According to a People's Daily Online story topping major internet news portals in China today, a recent meeting of the standing committee of the Hainan Provincial People's Congress passed a new "coastal public security management" law (防治安管理) defining six illegal actions by foreign vessels or people. The law authorizes coastal security agencies to board, search, impound, expel, stop or reroute vessels in violation.

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Topping the news page at QQ.com and several other internet sites today in China is the news that U.S. State Department spokesperson Victoria Newland said at a press conference yesterday that the U.S. opted to use the Japanese name of disputed islands northeast of Taiwan, which Japan calls the "Senkaku" and China calls the "Diaoyu."

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According to a report from the official Weibo of Heilongjiang Morning Post, a section of the Yangmingtan Bridge (阳明滩大桥) in the city of Harbin -- opened for traffic for less than a year -- collapsed at around 5:30 a.m. this morning. At least 3 people died in the collapse, and 5 injuries are reported.

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Topping the news today at QQ.com and several other Chinese news portals is a story from the official China News Service saying local city governments across China have announced a total of 7 trillion yuan in stimulus spending since July this year. News reports outside China -- like this one (http://on.wsj.com/Necf94) from the Wall Street Journal -- have questioned whether these funds will actually be spent, and whether they will give China's economy a boost.

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The official China News Service reports today that Chinese President Hu Jintao will visit Hong Kong on July 1 to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the territory's return to Chinese sovereignty. The visit will be Hu Jintao's third to Hong Kong, China News Service reported. Hu's first visit to the territory was on June 29, 1997. Activists in Hong Kong have said they hope to use Hu Jintao's presence for the anniversary celebrations to voice their anger over human rights abuses in China, including the suspicious death of Tiananmen activist Li Wangyang earlier this month, and what many see as a deteriorating rights situation in Hong Kong (http://bit.ly/L5065w).

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On May 29, 2012, an internet user posting under the alias "Woman Xiliyan" ( 女人犀利眼) wrote on Sina Weibo, one of China's most popular Twitter-like microblog services, that well-known China Central Television anchor Zhao Pu (赵普) had been removed for making online posts about several food safety issues. Rumors of Zhao Pu's alleged removal had been circulating since Mid-April, as Zhao repeatedly failed to appear on CCTV programming and his Sina Weibo account was inactive. Speaking to the Yangzi Evening News, a spokesperson for CCTV said news of Zhao Pu's removal was "fake", but the paper quote an anonymous insider as saying that Zhao had in fact been suspended from his duties for six months but not formally removed or suspended.

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