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Links 1 through 9 of 9 by Jess Day tagged ecampaigning+kony2012+lessons

Relates the Kony 2012 campaign to the broader challenges of responsible development and advocacy work, with some useful insights into the situation in Uganda, and parallels drawn with the author's own experience of Gaza.

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Round up of short comments from writers and commentators on social media. Useful points on the need for transparency, and the need to follow through on a hard-hitting message to continue to shape the agenda.

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As someone who believes that the ability to create and share media is an important form of power, the Invisible Children story presents a difficult paradox. If we want people to pay attention to the issues we care about, do we need to oversimplify them? And if we do, do our simplistic framings do more unintentional harm than intentional good?

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Great list of learning points from Kony 2012. What did they do right?

1. Make me F%$#ing care.
2. Have a theory of change.
3. Make the first step easy.
4. Target cultural influencers.
5. Have a strategy.
6. Know when to break the rules.
7. Don’t imitate, innovate.

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Rather than nail Invisible Children on their failures, I want to talk about what they’ve done really well - make a slick video that gets people really fired up. They’ve gotten million of people (mostly young white folk) to watch a 30 minute video and come away feeling empowered and part of a global community mobilising to address an injustice.
1.Placing the campaign in a broader narrative arc of people power bringing bad men to justice.
2.Subtle conditioning on the call to action.
3.Laying out a clear theory of change.
4.Telling a story of self to humanise the content.
5.Subtly challenging the viewer to engage.

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The Kony video did not go viral in the sense of magically taking off just because it was placed on social media platforms or because it was championed by celebrities alone. It went viral because there was a pre-existing network of activists, built up over years through Invisible Children’s media strategies, who used social media channels to spread it far and wide

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"In my view, most of the larger, more well known NGO's won't produce a communications piece this successful, unless they radically change their structures.
1. You've never met your supporters
2. You don't really have a twitter army
3. You speak to too many audiences
4. Your policy people would never let this get through
5. You run 18 campaigns & your site has 35 calls to action
6. Your organization isn't aligned towards the social web"

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I will look at Kony 2012 through the prism of two core video advocacy principles that guide our work here at WITNESS (do also look at an earlier post by my colleagues Rose and Matisse with initial reactions to “Kony 2012″ as a video advocacy example):
Principle 1: Video should be part of a campaign, complementing other forms of activism.
Principle 2: Storytelling should be audience-oriented and should provide a clear space for action.

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